Posts tagged ‘PaaS’

The real world cloud is hybrid, bimodal, multi-platform and difficult…#CloudWF

Guest Blog with NTT Communications

Which Apps? Which Cloud?
5 Findings About The Real World Cloud

The CIO of today is under more pressure than ever to balance the new with the old. He/she must embrace new digital possibilities for creating business value and simultaneously maintain a complex set of existing applications that are an organisation’s foundation. A critical factor that can help a CIO navigate this bi-modal tightrope is an assessment of the application estate and the impact of digitalisation on it.

To aid with the above and to establish the current benchmark for the application estate,  NTT Com commissioned independent research to understand which infrastructure is best suited to host which kind of applications in the real world. Further, the research aimed to ascertain if there was a correlation between the characteristics of an application (type, maturity, adoption rates) and its suitability for the cloud or the corporate data centre.

which delivery model

The responses showed that there are no definitive answers to these questions, but highlighted some interesting trends. Here are some of the key findings from the survey that can give a layer of clarity when making decisions about cloud.

  1. The reality – many apps many clouds:

    NTT Com’s study found that on average, an organisation runs hundred applications. In some sectors like telecoms and finance this number doubles. Organisations use four different cloud platforms on average and over 80% of respondents expect the number of cloud platforms to increase.

  2. Which Apps go Where – no definitive answers:

    The survey responses showed a lack of consensus on which applications are best suited to which environments. This did not mean a lack of faith in the cloud though. Respondents made it clear that they were comfortable deploying core business applications in the cloud.

  3. Cloud platforms – the winners and losers:
    While there is no clear choice on which platform is the most adopted, nearly 48% voted for IaaS in some form (Private and Public) making it the most favoured among the respondents. On the other hand, there weren’t many takers for PaaS, showing that PaaS providers still need to build confidence for this platform in enterprises.

    4. Top cloud benefits – scalability and cost:
    With 50% of respondents citing it, scalability emerged, unsurprisingly as the top cloud benefit, followed by cost (Capex and Opex) savings at 47%. These point out that despite the confusion around cloud platforms, organisations are clear about the benefits of cloud.

  4. Have Cloud, will move:
    Nearly 90% of respondents cited that they will migrate their most important application from the corporate datacentre to the cloud at some point. 60% believe this will happen within 2 years. What does this mean? The question is not “To cloud or not to cloud”, but when, how and how much.

In summary,  NTT Com’s findings show that the cloud ecosystem is complex and is affected by numerous factors such as the company type, industry, scale, size, and location. The real world cloud is hybrid, bimodal, multi-platform and difficult. There are no broad answers that can apply to all.

The CIO of today, when formulating strategies, must take into account all of these factors and aim for a realistic balance between achieving the benefits of cloud and managing its complexities. In doing so, he/she can create a winning strategy unique to the needs of his/her organisation.

To read the full report go here.  An infographic highlighting the key facts and figures of the report is available here.  Join the conversation on Twitter with the hashtag #realworldcloud.

NTT Communications

NTT Communications is our Headline Sponsor at Cloud World Forum, taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015 at Olympia Grand in London.

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Winning with the Internet of Things

Guest Blog with Fujitsu RunMyProcess

Winning with the Internet of Things

shutterstock_265601099Over the last 20 years we have seen successive innovations drive the influence of the Internet into new areas, connecting new kinds of resources, digitizing new interactions and opening up opportunities to challenge the underlying beliefs on which a range of industrial and social activities were based.

Every additional expansion has brought the emergence of new industry leaders – e.g. Amazon, Google, Facebook or Uber – who have used the expansion in connectivity to look at the world with fresh eyes.

Today, the Internet of Things (IoT) promises to drive the boundaries of the Internet further out than ever before, providing connectivity to potentially billions of everyday objects.  The sensors and actuators these objects embed will transform our understanding of real world events and enable us to simultaneously manipulate digital and physical environments in real time.  As connectivity penetrates the real world and transforms the potential of even the smallest and most mundane of everyday objects, huge new opportunities to transform customer experiences across a combination of digital and physical spaces will emerge.

But how do you become a winner in this new environment?  How do you maximize the benefits of these new information sources?  How do you leverage the newly connected things in combination with all of the other digital and human resources that already exist?  How do you go fast enough to stay ahead of the competition?  We believe that there are three principles that can help you drive a successful IoT strategy.

The Internet is the platform

Our first principle states that you can only achieve the full potential of the IoT by stressing the “Internet” over the “Things”.  Despite many waves of technology hype over the years, straightforward connectivity has been the most fundamental driver of transformational change.  It is therefore critical to base your IoT initiatives on existing Internet and Web standards at different layers, leveraging the ubiquitous protocols and patterns of the Internet to maximize connectivity potential and support open innovation.  Protocols such as Bluetooth smart, low power IPv6 and the constrained application protocol (CoAP) are bringing open, web-like access to smart objects while maximising their lifetime through sensible optimisations.

Think small to go large

Our second principle states that meaningful and disruptive innovation on the Internet has rarely been achieved in a top down, centrally planned fashion.  It is the open, chaotic and Darwinian nature of the Internet that has enabled such a high tempo of innovation.  Many discussions of the IoT, however, start with huge, complex and monolithic predictions of smart energy, smart agriculture, smart manufacturing, etc., which are on a scale that has little relevance to your business and which therefore cannot be grasped in terms of the small, actionable steps that you can take to start delivering value today.

To become a winner with the IoT you should ignore large, top down discussions and instead focus on rapidly delivering small, measurable improvements in individual activities and processes relevant to your business and its customers.  The technologies and platforms of the IoT are so low cost and easy to engage with that starting many small experiments is the best way to discover the potential value for your specific business.  In this sense successful approaches to IoT will need to leverage simple technologies and approaches that lower the barrier to entry for each individual case and which do not require the aggregation of many dubious business cases to provide a justification for large scale capital investment.

Connect value in the cloud

Our third principle states that the value of the IoT is meaningless unless you can seamlessly integrate and leverage the data it produces in a way which creates value at scale – for your customers, for your business or for society as a whole.  It’s not about individual sensors or smart devices; it’s about the way in which you combine them with other systems and people to rapidly deliver and evolve compelling, digitally transformed processes and activities.  The IoT should not be seen as a separate technology category – and yet another silo – but simply as an extension of the resources available to you in innovating and optimising your wider digital business processes.

For these reasons a high productivity platform as a service focused on rapid process transformation and integration is an ideal place to unlock the value of the IoT in combination with the wider digital environment.  By abstracting away low level technology, such platforms leave you free to focus on the rapid creation of valuable new digital flows which easily connect the people, systems and sensors necessary to deliver, test and scale systems which transform value for your customers and colleagues.  Most importantly using a high level platform as a service will enable you to deliver, test and scale your new processes faster than competitors who get bogged down in low level technology management of infrastructure and middleware.

And the winner is…

The IoT is bringing huge new opportunities to integrate information spanning the physical and digital worlds, opening up a whole new set of activities for digital disruption.  While grandiose concepts and technical language can make the subject seem overwhelming, use of these three principles can put you in a position to experiment and deliver at extremely low cost.

To prove the point we recently used our own principles to experiment with ways of improving the response to cycling accidents, connecting wearables, sensors, cloud services and mobile devices within a new digital flow.  By using CoAP, focusing on the improvement of a specific outcome and using our PaaS to connect across the whole environment we were able to help a small partner create significant value in just a few days.

The first key step to winning with the IoT is therefore to actually move; the low cost of experimentation and importance of gaining insight into this disruptive new area all make it critical to start shaping your future now – otherwise someone, somewhere will shape it for you.

Ian Thomas

ian thomasIan Thomas is a Fujitsu strategist and thought leader currently serving as Chief Marketing Officer of Fujitsu RunMyProcess.

Ian is an active writer and contributor to both Fujitsu thought leadership content and to external peer-reviewed conferences.  Most recently he has published a range of papers on the evolution of the Web and on the convergence of the Internet of Things, cloud and social infrastructures.  In this context he has also delivered a number of invited talks in various events around the world.

Fujitsu Run My Process

Fujitsu Run My Process is our Visionary Sponsor at Cloud World Forum, taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015 at Olympia Grand in London.

Don’t miss the chance to take advantage of all the knowledge and networking opportunities presented by EMEA’s only content-led Cloud exhibition.

Register for your FREE exhibition pass here!

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Exclusive Interview with Liam Quinn, IT Director of Richmond Events

1c061f4Session: Cloud as a Utility: Working Seamlessly Across Public & Private Clouds

When: 24th June 2015, 12:05 – 12:25

Where: Employee Experience Theatre

Liam Quinn is IT Director of Richmond Events, pioneers of the one-to-one, pre-scheduled strategic business forums, aiming to match buyers with sellers.

We took a few minutes with him to talk about the challenges and status of Cloud specifically in the events sector, and the importance of SaaS versus IaaS and PaaS.

The interview…

So just to kick off, what do you feel are the unique challenges you face in the events sector?

Our challenges really are two-fold.  The first one we have is the fact that there’s an explosion of technology at the moment within the industry. The challenge lies in trying to work out what is good, helpful technology that’s going to enhance the experience of our attendees, and filter out the stuff which is really a lot of hype or, good today but maybe not very useful in the future.

In terms of our part in the industry, being a multinational organization, we’re operating events in four different countries to a consistent and very similar model.  So trying to make sure that we have the right technology in place that can support all four different business models is a challenge.
In terms of cloud technology specifically, how do you see the status of it in your sector in 2015? Do you feel it differs from other sectors? 

It’s hard to believe we’re very different to anyone else, but that may be a naïve way of looking at it.  I think the cloud is impacting the sector in two ways.  First of all, there are many software solutions that are being developed at the moment and being pushed within the marketplace, which are very cloud-based. So the economies of scale are there, and the price per event or price per attendee is very low. These systems are utilizing the cloud model in order for these software solutions to be implemented across every event organizer who wishes to use it.

The second place, which is where we come in and a lot of our foreign competitors, is whereby people are trying to consolidate their internal IT systems in order to provide a much more cost effective base for providing IT support to the business itself.
Leading on from that, would you therefore say SaaS is more imperative than IaaS or PaaS specifically for the events sector?

I think from a third-party solution perspective, most of the solutions being used are SaaS.  I don’t think event organizers want large IT teams, or want to be developing their own software.  So there’s a lot of software out there.  What they want is to consume it in any way they desire, in any location and that’s why they’re looking for software solutions available that they can just tap in, log in to, and work for their event.  We differ from that slightly in that all our systems are actually bespoke written for ourselves.

Download the full interview here!

Join Liam at the Cloud World Forum at London’s Olympia on the 24th of June for his session: Cloud as a Utility: Working Seamlessly Across Public & Private Clouds.

Don’t miss the chance to take advantage of all the knowledge and networking opportunities presented by EMEA’s only Cloud & DevOps exhibition.

Register for your FREE exhibition pass here!

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Public clouds are becoming vertical market-centric

Ovum-logo-135

Summary

Public cloud vendors are increasingly focusing on vertical markets, which will significantly accelerate public cloud adoption by latecomers. The “verticalization” of public clouds comes as a result of efforts throughout vertical ecosystems, from regulators to traditional IT service providers such as IBM, as well as newcomers such as AWS, Salesforce.com, and Veeva. It will grow in parallel to public cloud providers increasingly moving from technology services to packages targeted at specific needs and audiences. For more information, see the 2014 Trends to Watch: Public Clouds report that looks at the overall public market trends as well as specific trends for infrastructure, platform, and software-as-a-service (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS) public clouds.

Vertical market regulators are catching up with public clouds

Vertical market regulators are catching up with public clouds, and will continue to do so in 2014. For example, the publication of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Omnibus Final Rule in early 2013 clarified that data centers and providers offering cloud-based services are officially considered Business Associates (BAs) under HIPAA and must therefore comply with all applicable privacy and security requirements. Similarly, in July 2013, De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB), the Dutch banking regulator, approved the use of the AWS cloud for all financial operations, such as websites, mobile applications, retail banking platforms, high-performance computing, and credit risk analysis solutions.

Vendors are increasingly vertical market-centric

Traditional IT product and service providers have been leveraging their vertical market expertise from the start, but newcomers have now begun to build up their vertical market-centric strategies. In 2013, for example, following the clarification of how HIPAA and cloud relate, both AWS and Google agreed to sign formal BA Agreements under HIPAA. Similarly, Salesforce.com, which has been certified as a BA for some time, is developing industry-specific solutions alongside its partner ecosystem. As a result, about one-quarter of the new applications added to Salesforce.com’s AppExchange marketplace in 2013 are vertical market-specific. In September 2013, Workday confirmed one of the worst-kept secrets in the higher education industry: it is building a student information system (SIS) called Student.

Vertical market-centric startups are emerging

In parallel, vertical markets-specific startups are increasingly in the headlines. Athenahealth reached about $600 in annual revenue in 2013 while pharmaceutical and life sciences specialist Veeva Systems attracted a lot of attention when it went public. It reached an impressive $4.6bn market capitalization on nearly $170m in trailing 12-month revenues. New vertical market-centric ecosystems are also emerging. For example, in 2013, CareCloud, an electronic medical records and practice management provider partnered with generic cloud storage provider Box as well as with US SaaS health appointment booking startup ZocDoc.

Public cloud verticalization will be slow but unstoppable

The verticalization of public clouds will be an ongoing trend until the end of the decade. Evolution will be slow as many vertical specialists struggle to move to the cloud. The public sector is a good example of this trend. It has been the target of generic public cloud providers such as AWS and Saleforce.com for a number of years. However, public sector specialists in areas such as benefits and transport management, for example, are much more cautious, all the more so because public clouds make it easier for third parties to compete with what they offer.

Nevertheless, they will have to make a move sooner rather than later because not only public sector organizations but also those in the private sector are increasingly asking for public cloud-based vertical-specific solutions. A variety of vertical market-specific Ovum reports illustrate this trend. Our Business Trends: Pharmaceutical Technology report, for example, indicates that while current levels of SaaS adoption are low in the lab informatics solutions such as laboratory information management systems (LIMSs) and electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs), most companies are now considering SaaS delivery for these solution types. Similarly, cloud service adoption in the capital markets has increased considerably in the last few years, as described in The Cloud in the Capital Markets: A Progress Report. Order management systems (OMS), which used to be deployed on-premise, are moving toward becoming hosted and managed services delivered by third parties. They are not yet fully cloud services, but they are on their way to becoming so. Portfolio management systems (PMS), which have followed OMS and have in some senses leapfrogged them, are already available in full cloud mode from companies such as Alphakinetic.

Appendix

Further reading

2014 Trends to Watch: From Private to Hybrid Clouds, IT022-000007 (March 2014)
2014 Trends to Watch: Public Clouds, IT022-000008 (March 2014)
2014 Trends to Watch: Cloud Computing, IT022-000006 (February 2014)
2014 Trends to Watch: Cloud Services, IT019-003310 (January 2014)

Cloud in the Capital Markets: A Progress Report, EI003-000004 (September 2013)

Business Trends: Pharmaceutical Technology, IT010-000169 (March 2013)

Methodology

  • Vendor events and analyst briefings.
  • Vendor meetings and technology assessments.
  • Interviews with end users.

Authors

Laurent Lachal, Senior Analyst, Ovum Software
Laurent.lachal@ovum.com

“Customers want one-stop shopping for IaaS and PaaS” – cloudControl CEO

How is the role of PaaS going to change in the next few years?

cloudControl CEO and founder Philipp Strube recently sat down with GigaOM to discuss this and other topics.

IaaS-only is not enough, says Strube – providers need an integrated PaaS for an offering to make sense. “Customers want one-stop shopping for both of the services. They have certain use cases where Infrastructure as a Service is enough, and another where Platform as a Service is better. But they want to be able to pick one provider now, and have both options later.” (more…)

We shouldn’t think so SPaaRSE with PaaS (sorry!)

13 01 2014

Not just for the little guy with no cuff-links or tux..

The Java PaaS company, CloudBees’ CEO recently made an insightful remark on how the concept of Platform as a Service (or PaaS) is commonly associated with smaller firms and individuals even that “gives [them] a chance to focus on creating and delivering applications while leaving behind the burden associated with infrastructure and operations.”

Sacha Labourey, whose company is somewhat synonymous with “PaaS” at the moment, goes on to state that enterprises that are traditionally late adopters are being disrupted by smaller, earlier adopters; and that there are two main drivers behind this:

Continuous Intergration (CI) in the Cloud 

and

Facilitating user engagement

What do you think?

As always, we’re most keen on the everyday, GRaaS-roots (sorry!), accounts of our adoring followers so please share!

For the full article, click here

 

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