Posts tagged ‘Internet of Things’

Connecting to the Future of the Internet of Things with Cassandra #CloudWF

Guest blog with DataStax

Connecting to the Future of the Internet of Things with Cassandra

Author: Seema Haji

Screen-Shot-2014-10-16-at-4.23.04-PM-250x301Millions of people, objects and ‘things’ connecting with each other is changing the way organizations and consumers interact with each other and the environment around them. Data comes from different geographical locations and across multiple channels.

Sensors on vehicles collect information on mileage, pressure, temperature, and even driving patterns and communicate it back to improve transportation efficiency and safety. Retailers are leveraging illumination, temperature and humidity sensors to gather data and make real-time adjustment on energy consumption to not only lower operational costs but also make our planet a better place. Healthcare solutions utilize these sensors to monitor and analyze patient and diagnostic data, saving lives with real-time transactional analytics. High velocity of massive amount of continuous data coming from wearable and communicable sensors immerse into the database system, challenging every bit of disconnectivity from what a modern Internet-of-Things application requires in database technology.

According to a survey from EMA (Enterprise Management Associates) Research with 259 business executives, analysts and IT managers, the needs of the business are aligned with IT drivers, but very disconnected with legacy infrastructures. Lines of business managers want faster query response times, competitive advantage via flexible solutions and operational efficiencies whereas legacy platforms have issues scaling to meet these challenges. Particularly for an IOT infrastructure, choosing the right data model is the key to success.

According to the survey, the data model must accommodate high-velocity sensor data and other considerations. Think of it this way: the hundreds of sensors and actuators generating massive volumes of unchangeable time-series data, only do so once. But the volume of data generated is vast; think Petabytes of information. To assimilate and analyze this information, database read / write performance is critical, particularly with high-velocity sensor data. Your database must support high-speed read and writes, and be continuously available (100% of the time) to gather this data at uniform intervals. In addition, you must plan for data scalability to maintain a cost-effective horizontal data store over time.pngbase64ee88add9c43ac79-250x271

Over time, we’ve seen plenty of IOT providers succeeding in related industries with Apache Cassandra and DataStax Enterprise, the most scalable distributed database technology, providing 24×7 uptime and blazing read/write performance for IOT solutions.

Pressure management solution provider i2O Water is able to save millions liters of water every single day; Riptide IO helps retailers save millions of dollars on energy consumption with its smart building and equipment assets management technology; Amara Health provides real-time predictive analytics to support clinicians in the early detection of critical disease states.

Check out our upcoming Webinar on the 20th May to discover how i2O addresses the water crisis with an Internet of Things solution built on Apache Cassandra™ and learn what your IOT solution can achieve with Apache Cassandra™.

DataStax

DataStax is our IoT Big Data & Analytics Theatre Sponsor at Cloud World Forum, taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015 at Olympia Grand in London.

Johnny Miller, Solutions Architect at DataStax EMEA will be speaking on the 24th June at 12.10pm at the Cloud World Forum about Scaleable, Available and Secure data for the Internet of Things with DataStax Enterprise.

Don’t miss the chance to take advantage of all the knowledge and networking opportunities presented by EMEA’s only content-led Cloud exhibition.

Register for your FREE exhibition pass here!

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Winning with the Internet of Things

Guest Blog with Fujitsu RunMyProcess

Winning with the Internet of Things

shutterstock_265601099Over the last 20 years we have seen successive innovations drive the influence of the Internet into new areas, connecting new kinds of resources, digitizing new interactions and opening up opportunities to challenge the underlying beliefs on which a range of industrial and social activities were based.

Every additional expansion has brought the emergence of new industry leaders – e.g. Amazon, Google, Facebook or Uber – who have used the expansion in connectivity to look at the world with fresh eyes.

Today, the Internet of Things (IoT) promises to drive the boundaries of the Internet further out than ever before, providing connectivity to potentially billions of everyday objects.  The sensors and actuators these objects embed will transform our understanding of real world events and enable us to simultaneously manipulate digital and physical environments in real time.  As connectivity penetrates the real world and transforms the potential of even the smallest and most mundane of everyday objects, huge new opportunities to transform customer experiences across a combination of digital and physical spaces will emerge.

But how do you become a winner in this new environment?  How do you maximize the benefits of these new information sources?  How do you leverage the newly connected things in combination with all of the other digital and human resources that already exist?  How do you go fast enough to stay ahead of the competition?  We believe that there are three principles that can help you drive a successful IoT strategy.

The Internet is the platform

Our first principle states that you can only achieve the full potential of the IoT by stressing the “Internet” over the “Things”.  Despite many waves of technology hype over the years, straightforward connectivity has been the most fundamental driver of transformational change.  It is therefore critical to base your IoT initiatives on existing Internet and Web standards at different layers, leveraging the ubiquitous protocols and patterns of the Internet to maximize connectivity potential and support open innovation.  Protocols such as Bluetooth smart, low power IPv6 and the constrained application protocol (CoAP) are bringing open, web-like access to smart objects while maximising their lifetime through sensible optimisations.

Think small to go large

Our second principle states that meaningful and disruptive innovation on the Internet has rarely been achieved in a top down, centrally planned fashion.  It is the open, chaotic and Darwinian nature of the Internet that has enabled such a high tempo of innovation.  Many discussions of the IoT, however, start with huge, complex and monolithic predictions of smart energy, smart agriculture, smart manufacturing, etc., which are on a scale that has little relevance to your business and which therefore cannot be grasped in terms of the small, actionable steps that you can take to start delivering value today.

To become a winner with the IoT you should ignore large, top down discussions and instead focus on rapidly delivering small, measurable improvements in individual activities and processes relevant to your business and its customers.  The technologies and platforms of the IoT are so low cost and easy to engage with that starting many small experiments is the best way to discover the potential value for your specific business.  In this sense successful approaches to IoT will need to leverage simple technologies and approaches that lower the barrier to entry for each individual case and which do not require the aggregation of many dubious business cases to provide a justification for large scale capital investment.

Connect value in the cloud

Our third principle states that the value of the IoT is meaningless unless you can seamlessly integrate and leverage the data it produces in a way which creates value at scale – for your customers, for your business or for society as a whole.  It’s not about individual sensors or smart devices; it’s about the way in which you combine them with other systems and people to rapidly deliver and evolve compelling, digitally transformed processes and activities.  The IoT should not be seen as a separate technology category – and yet another silo – but simply as an extension of the resources available to you in innovating and optimising your wider digital business processes.

For these reasons a high productivity platform as a service focused on rapid process transformation and integration is an ideal place to unlock the value of the IoT in combination with the wider digital environment.  By abstracting away low level technology, such platforms leave you free to focus on the rapid creation of valuable new digital flows which easily connect the people, systems and sensors necessary to deliver, test and scale systems which transform value for your customers and colleagues.  Most importantly using a high level platform as a service will enable you to deliver, test and scale your new processes faster than competitors who get bogged down in low level technology management of infrastructure and middleware.

And the winner is…

The IoT is bringing huge new opportunities to integrate information spanning the physical and digital worlds, opening up a whole new set of activities for digital disruption.  While grandiose concepts and technical language can make the subject seem overwhelming, use of these three principles can put you in a position to experiment and deliver at extremely low cost.

To prove the point we recently used our own principles to experiment with ways of improving the response to cycling accidents, connecting wearables, sensors, cloud services and mobile devices within a new digital flow.  By using CoAP, focusing on the improvement of a specific outcome and using our PaaS to connect across the whole environment we were able to help a small partner create significant value in just a few days.

The first key step to winning with the IoT is therefore to actually move; the low cost of experimentation and importance of gaining insight into this disruptive new area all make it critical to start shaping your future now – otherwise someone, somewhere will shape it for you.

Ian Thomas

ian thomasIan Thomas is a Fujitsu strategist and thought leader currently serving as Chief Marketing Officer of Fujitsu RunMyProcess.

Ian is an active writer and contributor to both Fujitsu thought leadership content and to external peer-reviewed conferences.  Most recently he has published a range of papers on the evolution of the Web and on the convergence of the Internet of Things, cloud and social infrastructures.  In this context he has also delivered a number of invited talks in various events around the world.

Fujitsu Run My Process

Fujitsu Run My Process is our Visionary Sponsor at Cloud World Forum, taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015 at Olympia Grand in London.

Don’t miss the chance to take advantage of all the knowledge and networking opportunities presented by EMEA’s only content-led Cloud exhibition.

Register for your FREE exhibition pass here!

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The future call centre: 10 predictions for the next 10 years

Guest Blog with NewVoiceMedia

Video-service-198x300What will the call centre of 2025 look like?

Well, to start with, it’s unlikely to be a physical ‘centre’ anymore. The rise of cloud technology is predicted to lead to an increase in remote working. But this move outside the office walls is far from businesses shunning the contact centre.

The omnipresent eye of social media has put companies in the limelight – for good and for bad, pushing customer service right to the top of the priority list. As a result,  looks set to become a key differentiator from now onwards, and the call centre will be at the forefront of this strategy.

Here we explore the trends that look set to transform the call centre in ten years’ time.

1. The call center will become a ‘relationship hub’

For years, many have considered the call centre as a way of dealing with immediate problems. This led to a short-term strategy of dealing with one customer emergency after another – reacting instead of adapting to the needs of the customer. Instead of picking up the pieces when things go wrong, we predict that the contact centre will become an integral part of business strategy, acting as a ‘relationship hub’.

Contact centre agents are the first to know if something isn’t working and are therefore perfectly poised to advise the business. It’s the people on the other end of the phone that know what the customers really think. Customer service can be seen as an afterthought – what happens after the marketing department has reeled them in, but really, it should be part of every stage of business development, supplying sales and marketing with repeat purchasers and advocates, as well as an essential data point for product management and development.

2. Customer service agents will become ‘super agents’

As the call centre becomes an increasingly important part of the business, so do the people that work there. They will need to adapt their skillset to meet the demands of the future customer and the expectations directors place on the contact centre. Plus, with the rise of ‘self-help’ and user communities, only the most complex problems will end up in a call centre. Agents will need to be ready to tackle challenging issues and be able to unpick the situation to pinpoint what exactly went wrong.

It’s therefore not surprising that in the next ten years, the average customer service agent will need to have a much wider range of skills. Aside from excellent communication skills, they’ll need analytical problem-solving skills, project management – and in some cases, technical training, in order to understand the finer details of the product or service. Alongside all of this, customer service agents will need to be able to adapt to changes in technology – from becoming an expert in every new app and social network, to utilising the increasing range of data on their CRM.

3. Call routing systems will find the ‘perfect match’ 

Intelligent call-routing is already available now, but it’s predicted to grow in the next ten years – matching the customer with the right expert almost instantly. As CRM and workflow management systems develop, a complex ‘match-making’ process will occur every time a customer calls, to ensure the right expert is on hand to solve every problem. Many also believe that organisations will begin to publish their agents’ availability online, so that customers can pick the agent that best suits their needs and call them directly.

4. Web chat will become an increasingly popular customer service channel

It can be frustrating to be on the other end of a phone – whether you’re an agent or a customer, the channel has its limits. The success of Amazon Mayday has made video-based live chat a real possibility. The channel has huge potential, because it allows agents to develop a more personal connection with customers through face-to-face chat. Plus, have you ever wanted to show a customer how something works? With video chat, this becomes a possibility. It also eliminates the idea of being put on hold – even if the agent isn’t speaking, the customer is connected via the visual feed. Video web chat also allows contact centres to anticipate problems as customers navigate their website and ensure the right agent pops up at the right time.

5. Customer service will become the key differentiator

With the rise of intangible products, which only exist via your mobile or laptop, customer experience is becoming more important as a differentiator. Consumers don’t just want great customer service, they demand it. In the UK, half of consumers said they would buy from a competitor as the result of poor customer experience. This is similar in the US, with 44% of consumers taking their business elsewhere as a result of inadequate service.

Plus, with the death of sustainable competitive advantage, companies can no longer rely on their well-defined niche to keep them ahead. The elusive ‘experience’ becomes more important and customer service moves straight to the top of the agenda. Add to this the growth of social media and customer service has transformed from a one-to-one interaction to a public conversation. With customer service becoming this transparent, companies have realised they need to up their game. You can no longer hide bad customer service behind closed doors; every business has an online footprint of their successes and failures for all to see. As a result, companies will start to compete to offer the best customer service – with social media recommendations being the ultimate prize.

6. Mobile is the future – for customer service agents and customers

According to the Economist, mobile apps are predicted to become the second most important channel for engaging with brands – just behind social media. And it’s not just about apps, as the mobile phone becomes an increasingly important part of everyday life. It’s how your customers are most likely to get in contact with you – via email, live chat, social media or in a voice call. Companies need to optimise their mobile functionality for this – particularly by allowing customers to multi-task on their mobile. For instance, being able to read the FAQs page while on the phone to the customer service agent. Your customer service agents will make the same demands for mobile. Being able to access a mobile CRM is a key ingredient for flexible working.

7. Expect channel preferences to change (and change again)

As consumers demand a personalised approach to just about everything – they expect to be able to mix & match the customer service channels to create a tailor-made service. However, it’s becoming increasingly hard to predict and plan for the channel-hopping. That’s why we predict that whatever the preference is at the moment, it will change in the next ten years – probably several times. How contact centres are able to adapt to customers switching between channels will determine their success.

This is particularly true if businesses want to appeal to the millennial generation, who are notorious for channel-switching, as they move from mobile to tablet to laptop, all in a matter of hours. Being able to follow those channel hops while maintaining the context of the interaction is key to customer service success. And it’s not just about keeping up with the change in device or channel, businesses need to keep up with the technology itself. New apps and social networks are launched all the time – WhatsApp is a great example of a channel that’s taken off rapidly and is becoming a popular choice for customer service.

8. Voice biometrics will replace security questions

“What’s your mother’s maiden name?” is one of many common security questions, but in the next ten years, it’ll be more about how the customer answers a question than the answer itself which confirms their identity. Gathering the unique ‘voiceprints’ of your customers could be the answer to security problems, as voice biometrics technology develops. It’s much harder to replicate the human voice than it is to steal facts about a customer. Voice biometrics record the intricacies of the human voice – from picking up on the size and shape of the mouth to the tension of the vocal cords.

9. Remote working and location-based services will increase

With the rise of cloud-based SaaS, having all your agents in one place is no longer necessary. It’s actually much more than unnecessary – switching to remote working agents has lots of benefits. This approach can reduce the costs associated with running a call centre and give employees greater flexibility. It is predicted that the growing number of virtual call centres could lead to more location-based services. For instance, a customer calling a company could be automatically connected to an agent working remotely a few miles from their location. The agent could even arrange to meet the customer if necessary, which could be very useful for certain sectors.

10. The “internet of things”

Described by many as the third great wave of computing – the “internet of things” or the “internet of everything” could change the way the world works. With more and more devices being able to connect to other devices or people independently, it gives rise to a world where almost everything is connected. This could have huge implications for the contact centre, enabling businesses to deliver pre-emptive service. For instance, if a patient’s heart monitor is over-heating, the device could send an automated service request to the right team. On a more domestic level, washing machines may be able to self-diagnose problems and notify the manufacturer when the part needs replacing – taking the customer out of the equation altogether.

The implication is that attitudes will shift – instead of buying a product, consumers will be buying a product with built-in customer service, raising the stakes for getting service right.

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NewVoiceMedia are Salesforce Pavillion Partner and exhibitors at Cloud World Forum, taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015 at Olympia Grand in London.

Don’t miss the chance to take advantage of all the knowledge and networking opportunities presented by EMEA’s only content-led Cloud exhibition.

Register for your FREE exhibition pass here!

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Strategy: The Future of Work – Technology People and Moore’s Law

Source: Martin King

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When we think about work we usually think about people – their mental or physical effort – either alone, with other people or with technology. However, the characteristics of both technology and people are changing and so will the future of work.

Technology has always been an important factor in work – from the earliest of times people have developed and used tools to compliment, enhance and amplify what they can do. Where work and the actions of a tool are repetitive and predictable then it becomes possible to automate the tool to create a machine.

Tools compliment people in work whereas machines replace them in work and change the nature of work at the same time. While people use a tool to do work, with a machine its different –  the machine does the work  and people’s work becomes the machine – operating and attending to the machine.

Machines have only been able to go so far economically (compared with the cost of people to do the same task) and to where and how they can be applied. However, all this is changing – changing economics and technology suggest that we are entering a new machine age and this has radical consequences for the future of people in work.

Technology developments are starting to radically reduce the cost of robots and machines while at the same time the cost of people continues to increase  – making machines more economical than ever before. Computer developments, machine learning and AI are radically changing how and where machines are applied. The predictability required by machines once meant that they were applied only in controlled environments (a typical factory installation for example) but now we are starting to see more machines operating in the real world – Google’s driverless car is an important precursor of this development. The same trend has already happened in IT – where once computers were large, expensive and used in special conditions (think of an office and a desktop PC) .. we now find them out in the real world with us (think smartphones and wearable tech). In the years ahead we should expect to see more and more machines and robots leaving their factories for our world.

Once something becomes digital change and impact becomes rapid (if not exponential) – we are starting to see “Moore’s law” in the digital aspect of machines – if this is the case then we should expect to see radical advances in the application of machines and robots in the 21st century. In 1997 IBMs Deep Blue became the first machine to beat a human world champion at chess – 14 years later IBM returned with Watson to become the first machine win the TV trivia game Jeopardy in 2011. Deep blue was very much a traditional machine – it did one thing .. a special purpose computer to play chess by “brute force analysis” to work out chess moves to greater depth than any human player ever could. Watson however represented something different – IBM describes it as a “smart machine” able to answer questions in natural language. Since winning Jeopardy IBM has developed Watson and what it calls cognitive technology – Watson is now 24 times faster, 90 times smaller and described as performance improved by 2,400%. IBM have made Watson available on the web as a cloud product and developer “ecosystem” to support the development of what IBM describe as “cognitive apps” – today – you can carry Watson in your pocket!

On the 7th June 2014 computer program Eugene Goostman simulated a 13 year old boy from Odessa in unrestricted conversations – a machine passed the Turing test for the first time

On December 7th 2014 IPsoft launched Amelia – described as “the first cognitive agent who understands like a human … our cognitive knowledge worker, interfaces on human terms. She is a virtual agent who understands what people ask – even what they feel – when they call for service. Amelia can be deployed straight from the cloud in a fraction of the time. She learns as she works and provides high-quality responses consistently, every day of the year, in every language your customers speak”  IPsoft sees Amelia supplementing, or directly replacing, virtually all ‘non-expert, repetitive’ job functions from customer support to expert assistance and back office roles.

Management consultancy Accenture is using Amelia in its cognitive services saying “The cognitive and learning capabilities of the Amelia platform allow it to easily absorb routine processes as well as learn from natural language interactions in order to solve customer problems and respond successfully to a wide range of queries”. Accenture is helping Shell deploy Amelia in its internal training programme, answering queries from learning advisors – “she will observe how advisors interact with staff until she is ready to automate the processes herself.” Baker Hughes is testing Amelia in its financial department on its Accounts Payable helpdesk to address queries from vendors around invoices and payments.

Sean Ammirati writes that Any office job that involves drudgery is a candidate for automation. One way to think about occupations ripe for robots is to look at different professional tasks with a knowable problem and solution – even if it’s really complex to figure out that solution.

Research from the Oxford Martin School at Oxford university suggests that nearly half of all jobs in the US are likely to be automated in the coming decades. The research concludes that  “While computerisation has been historically confined to routine tasks involving explicit rule-based activities  algorithms for big data are now rapidly entering domains reliant upon pattern recognition and can readily substitute for labour in a wide range of non-routine cognitive tasks . In addition, advanced robots are gaining enhanced senses and dexterity, allowing them to perform a broader scope of manual tasks. For workers to win the race, they will have to acquire creative and social skills.

A recent report from Deloitte suggests that Computers and robots are set to replace more than a third of UK jobs in the next twenty years. Work in repetitive processing,  office administration, clerical and support service jobs, sales and transportation are most at risk. The report says that “Although the replacement of people by machines is well understood, the scale and scope of changes yet to come may not be … Unless these changes coming in the next two decades are fully understood and anticipated by businesses, policy makers and educators, there will be a risk of avoidable unemployment and under-employment”

But wait .. there’s more. Brian Arthur writes about the Second Economy – the computer-intensive portion of the economy where machines transact with other machines without humans in a “vast, automatic, and invisible economy without workers thereby bringing the biggest change since the Industrial Revolution

At the very extreme pessimistic end of the spectrum Stephen Hawking thinks that “Artificial Intelligence Could End Human Race”, Nick Bostrom warns that AI could be more dangerous than nuclear weapons and that “artificial intelligence may doom the human race within a century” while Elon Musk hopes “we’re not just the biological boot loader for digital superintelligence”  that “With artificial intelligence, we are summoning the demon” and “worries Skynet is only five years off

The changes in technology mentioned above suggest radical and pessimistic negative impacts for work and for people but this assumes nothing else changes. However, people are incredibly resourceful  and other views are more optimistic.

Gerd Leonhard suggests that the concept of work as we know it is toast but that many new areas will open up in new or unpredictable niches, with titles we can only guess at at present and that there are all those areas where human soft skills are essential. Many lower-paid but intricate jobs (think electricians or plumbers) with too many variables may be too expensive to automate. And there will surely always be a premium for the human touch in some areas that could be automated – cooking or teaching, for example

Greg Satell gives some useful advice on How to Avoid Being Replaced By A Robot –  learn To Ask Questions, Improve your social skills and go beyond the routine. “the division is no longer between manual and cognitive tasks as much as it is between routine and non-routine work.” Anything that is standardised and routine is at risk of being automated.  Greg leaves us with the optimistic message that by “automating tasks, we are liberating human imagination and the human spirit.  The more we unlock the secrets of technology, the more we find ourselves.”

Andrew McAfee compares the information revolution with the industrial revolution and takes a very optimistic view – “what we’re in the middle of now is overcoming the limitations of our individual brains and infinitely multiplying our mental power. How can this not be as big a deal as overcoming the limitations of our muscles?” … we ain’t seen nothing yet. The best days are really ahead”. Andrew makes the point that “Economies run on ideas. So the work of innovation, the work of coming up with new ideas, is some of the most powerful, some of the most fundamental work that we can do in an economy. In the technology-facilitated world .. the work of innovation is becoming more open, more inclusive, more transparent, and more merit-based.

As automation looks set to impact traditional notions of work and how we work technology changes and a new generation of people emerge that can make the most of the new conditions and potentially reimagine work as we know it. In 2014 Internet traffic from mobile use exceeded PC use for the first time – signalling the start of a new era of anytime, anywhere IT and the potential for anytime, anywhere work. Rather than us having to come to work – work can come to us. Mobile IT combined with social media, cloud and web access are powerful tools in the right hands. New cultural movements like the Maker Movement combined with new technologies like 3D printing, Internet of Things and cheaper more accessible “maker” electronics like Raspberry PI, Adruino and Intel’s Edison suggest potential future artisan economies of scope, creativity and imagination while machines replace more routine and standardised work.

The generation who have “grown up digital” in the 21st century have grown up with the tools we shaped for them – the Net, the Web, mobile phones, smartphones, social networks and social media. Generation Z have grown up with information and communication at their fingertips. Those born in the 21st century will be able to “race with the machines” – and as Greg Satell says “our value will be determined not by how much we know or even how hard we work, but how well we collaborate with machines and with each other”. Research by Sparks & Honey’describes Generation Z as developing their personalities and life skills in a socio-economic environment marked by chaos, uncertainty, volatility and complexity. They have learned that traditional choices don’t guarantee success. They  “Intend to change the world. That entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship is one of their most popular career choices – 72% want to start a business and 61% want to be an entrepreneur rather than an employee.

While it seems that a new generation are ready to “race with the machines” John Hagel suggests that our institutions and their organisation are the main problem. He says that “at its core, this isn’t a technological challenge, but an institutional challenge. We’re dealing with a set of institutions that are increasingly inappropriate for the mounting pressure we face. The root cause is how we’ve defined work in companies … one of the issues is this formula for how work is conducted was developed in the last century, and it was based on a set of infrastructures and assumption of a stable environment that made it easy to define standardized highly-scripted work. Now we’re in a world that’s more rapidly changing, more uncertainty, more of those extreme events that Taleb calls the “black swans” that make it really critical for us as individuals in the workplace to take much more initiative, to be constantly exercising creativity and imagination to respond to the unexpected events.  That’s a very different model of work.  It requires a very different way of organizing our institutions and a different set of work practices that are much harder to automate.  Rather than pursuing scalable efficiency, perhaps we need a new set of institutions that can drive scalable learning, helping participants to learn faster by working together.

“We have stone-age emotions, medieval institutions and godlike technology.”— E.O. Wilson

Hagel says that “Until we can develop an alternative institutional model, one that can scale as effectively as the scalable efficiency model, we will face mounting pressure from machines and remain locked in a race against the machine without the ability to finally race with the machine. The problem is how do we innovate our institutions and our work practices so that we, in fact, can start “racing with the machine.”

Ultimately technology may provide a platform to race with machines – a new generation of developers like Vitalik Buterin working with open, autonomous, decentralised technologies suggest could Bootstrap decentralized autonomous corporations where we can work together with other agents on the network … not necessarily knowing whether they are human or not.

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Martin will be presenting in the Employee Experience Theatre at the Cloud World Forum, at Olympia Grand in London on the 24th June 2015, on ‘Capitalising on New Technologies: Discussing the Future of Cloud, AI, Robotics, Anticipatory Computing

Don’t miss the chance to take advantage of all the knowledge and networking opportunities presented by EMEA’s only content-led Cloud exhibition.

Register for your FREE exhibition pass here!

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TeliaSonera CCO says operators have two choices: dumb pipe or ‘next gen telco’ #telcocloud

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TeliaSonera’s chief commercial officer Hélène Barnekow told BCN sister publication Telecoms.com that operators can either remain the provider of dumb pipes or become a ‘next gen telco’ as the industry continues to change to a more software and services driven, converged market.    

Barnekow: Operators need to embrace a more
software-defined, cloud-centric world

While technology innovation is playing its role in the changing face of the industry, Barnekow says the real driver of the transformation is the customer. “The [industry] landscape is changing very quickly, and I actually try to frame that change from two angels,” she says. “One is from the customers’ point of view because it’s not that technology is driving customers, customers are driving us.”

“Their expectations are increasing so quickly that it’s actually mind-boggling, and of course this is because technology has enabled them to do things they couldn’t do before so they can put higher demands on us. But their expectations on us [operators] keeping them connected all the time, seamlessly, always-on, making it easier and easier to stream, to download things are constantly increasing.”

According to Barnekow, increasing demands for data and the industry becoming more saturated with IT, as well as the emergence of IoT and M2M are blurring the lines between sectors and changing the traditional telco. She says this leaves operators with one of two choices. “I think you almost have two choices as an operator: either you say that you can be very, very efficient with pipes and that somebody else can deal with all of that and you’re going to have the lowest cost and the best quality on my pipe, transmit as much data as possible.”

“Or you say you want to be a value-added provider to your customers and then you want to be very customer-focused and provide the customer with what they want. We’ve decided to be the second, and we call that the next-generation telco.”

With this in mind, TeliaSonera has put in place a two-tiered strategy, first announced at the operator’s Capital Markets Day in September. Under this strategy the telco says it focuses on enhancing the core business on one hand and on the other exploring opportunities close to the core, including IoT/M2M, music, mobile financial services, TV and security.

While OTT partnerships play an important role for TeliaSonera, with Barnekow especially emphasising its collaboration with Spotify, the operator has also launched an OTT TV service of its own in Finland and Denmark in December, with other markets set to follow.

“We’ve had a pay-TV offer in Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Estonia and Lithuania for quite some time. Originally it has of course been very much linked to our fibre business, and of course it’s an attractive offer with 1.5 million subscribers. This is a healthy business for us and an important one, but the way in which consumers consume TV services is changing and OTT TV is definitely accelerating.”

Barnekow says she’s confident in TeliaSonera’s ability to compete against such service providers as Netflix, claiming being able to deliver local-language content is one important factor, along with subscribers being able to have the service under the same account as mobile subscription. “We have noticed that local language content for kids is especially attractive to customers,” she says.

TeliaSonera operates in the Nordics and Baltics, as well as in the emerging Eurasian region (Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Moldova, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Nepal), and although none of these markets have yet fully embraced convergent offerings, Barnekow says this is very close to happening in the mature markets in Europe.

“These [Spotify and the OTT TV offer] are the first steps we’ve taken [towards convergence] and we will build on that. What we do believe is that convergence becomes very, very important part of our strategy of our core offering. Especially for the more mature markets like Sweden and Finland, but also Estonia which is very much at the fore-front. We are working on it [convergent offering] as we speak, we haven’t launched it yet but we’re very close to.”

Source: Business Cloud News

_______________________________________________________________________________________imageedit_14_3273410547Join Speaker David Andreasson, Head of Product and Technology from TeliaSonera at the Telco Cloud Forum taking place in London on 27-29 April 2015.

Registration is free of charge for telecom operators and enterprises.

Free exhibition open to all!

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Interview with Analytics and Big Data Speaker, Carl Wiper from the Information Commissioner’s Office #bigdataws

2013_Feb_Carl_WiperIn the build up to the Analytics and Big Data Congress taking place in London between 2-3 December, we caught up with Speaker Carl Wiper from the Information Commissioner’s Office. Read on for his view on the World of Analytics and Big Data!

a) What does your role at the ICO involve?

I work in the Policy Delivery department of the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). This involves researching new developments, such as the growth of big data and open data, and working out the implications in terms of data protection and freedom of information. We then produce guidance documents to help practitioners to comply with the Data Protection Act and the Freedom of Information Act.

b) What do you foresee as being the growing challenge you will face in your role over the coming 3 years, and how are you preparing to face this?

Developments in technology, including the growing capability of big data analytics and the Internet of Things, mean that personal data is being collected and used in new ways that may not be apparent to the people concerned. The challenge for us is to understand how the data…

To download the full free interview, please visit: www.analyticsandbigdatacongress.com/speaker-interview-with-carl-wiper-information-commissioners-office

Join Carl Wiper along with senior analytics and big data experts from; Asda, BBCNational Grid, Vodafone, Walt Disney Company… and many more! at the Analytics and Big Data Congress taking place in London this December 2014!

Click here to register for a free enterprise pass!

Analytics & Big Data Europe Congress – Registration now open!

analytics-bd-300x220We are delighted to inform you that registration for the Analytics and Big Data Europe Congress, taking place at the Kensington Close Hotel in London between 2-3 December 2014, is now open. (*Free to attend for Enterprises and Telcos!)

The Analytics & Big Data Europe Congress   is your ultimate chance to meet and learn from end-user leading organisations. Consumer insights, marketing, analytics, data experts and more are coming together to provide an in-depth business value case for Analytics and Big Data.

An agenda led by practical examples, advice and real world evidence, with an emphasis on engaging content and interactive formats, delivered by the experience market leaders.

Download the Draft Agenda here!

www.analyticsandbigdatacongress.com

Network and discuss key challenges and opportunities with industry experts:

  • Best in class methodologies to institutionalise big data analytics in your organisation
  • What is your role in driving a cultural shift to a data driven decision making?
  • Draw actionable consumer insights based on your data analytics capacity
  • Integrate analytics with marketing strategy & CRM to build a loyal, long lasting relationship with your clients
  • Discussing advanced technologies such as the Internet of Things and Machine Learning to your IT strategy and how to monetise on them
  • Evaluate the need for a strong digital presence of the organisation: The Web and Social Media
  • Developing and retaining the hard-to-find expert, talented employees
  • Identify how big data analytics can improve efficiency in different departments through successful case studies

New Methods for CSPs by Claire McCarthy thumbnailFREE Industry related content: New Methods for CSPs by Claire McCarthy

Using data to create and monetize new offers or improve performance and customer engagement has been a focus for communications service providers (CSPs) in the last few years. CSPs have huge data repositories at a network, operational, service, application, and customer level, and use analytics suites to obtain actionable insights…

To download New Methods for CSPs by Claire McCarthy, a content piece provided by Ovum, please click here.

We hope you can join us!

Analytics and Big Data Europe Congress 2014 |  Informa Telecoms & Media
#bigdataws

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