Posts tagged ‘cloud solutions’

Tackling the resource gap in the transition to hybrid IT

Is hybrid IT inevitable? That’s a question we ask customers a lot. From our discussions with CIOs and CEOs there is one overriding response and that is the need for changimagese. It is very clear that across all sectors, CEOs are challenging their IT departments to innovate – to come up with something different.

Established companies are seeing new threats coming into the market. These new players are lean, hungry and driving innovation through their use of IT solutions. Our view is that more than 70 percent of all CEOs are putting a much bigger ask on their IT departments than they did a few years ago.

There has never been so much focus on the CIO or IT departmental manager from a strategic standpoint. IT directors need to demonstrate how they can drive more uptime, improve the customer experience, or enhance the e-commerce proposition for instance, in a bid to win new business. For them, it is time to step up to the plate. But in reality there’s little or no increase in budget to accommodate these new demands.

We call the difference between what the IT department is being asked to do, and what it is able to do, the resources gap. Seemingly, with the rate of change in the IT landscape increasing, the demands on CIO’s by the business increasing and with little or no increase in IT budgets from one year to the next, that gap is only going to get wider.

But by changing their way of working, companies can free up additional resources to go and find their innovative zeal and get closer to meeting their business’ demands. Embracing Hybrid IT as their infrastructure strategy can extend the range of resources available to companies and their ability to meet business demands almost overnight.

Innovate your way to growth

A Hybrid IT environment provides a combination of its existing on-premise resources with public and private cloud offerings from a third party hosting company. Hybrid IT has the ability to provide the best of both worlds – sensitive data can still be retained in-house by the user company, whilst the cloud, either private or public, provides the resources and computing power that is needed to scale up (or down) when necessary.

Traditionally, 80 percent of an IT department’s budget is spent just ‘keeping the lights on’. That means using IT to keep servers working, powering desktop PCs, backing up work and general maintenance etc.

But with the CEO now raising the bar, more innovation in the cloud is required. Companies need to keep their operation running but reapportion the budget so they can become more agile, adaptable and versatile to keep up with today’s modern business needs.

This is where Hybrid IT comes in. Companies can mix and match their needs to any type of solution. That can be their existing in-house capability, or they can share the resources and expertise of a managed services provider. The cloud can be private – servers that are the exclusive preserve of one company – or public, sharing utilities with a number of other companies.

Costs are kept to a minimum because the company only pays for what they use. They can own the computing power, but not the hardware. Crucially, it can be switched on or off according to needs. So, if there is a peak in demand, a busy time of year, a last minute rush, they can turn on this resource to match the demand. And off again.

This is the journey to the Hybrid cloud and the birth of the agile, innovative market-focused company.

Meeting the market needs

Moving to hybrid IT is a journey.  Choosing the right partner to make that journey with is crucial to the success of the business. In the past, businesses could get away with a rigid customer / supplier relationship with their service provider. Now, there needs to be a much greater emphasis on creating a partnership so that the managed services provider can really get to understand the business. Only by truly getting under the skin of a business can the layers be peeled back to reveal a solution to the underlying problem.

The relationship between customer and managed service provider is now also much more strategic and contextual. The end users are looking for outcomes, not just equipment to plug a gap.

As an example, take an airline company operating in a highly competitive environment. They view themselves as being not in the people transportation sector, but as a retailer providing a full shopping service (with a trip across the Atlantic thrown in). They want to use cloud services to take their customer on a digital experience, so the minute a customer buys a ticket is when the journey starts.

When the passenger arrives at the airport, they need to check in, choose the seats they want, do the bag drop and clear security all using on-line booking systems. Once in the lounge, they’ll access the Wi-Fi system, check their Hotmail, browse Facebook, start sharing pictures etc. They may also choose last minute adjustments to their journey like changing their booking or choosing to sit in a different part of the aircraft.

Merely saying “we’re going to do this using the cloud” is likely to lead to the project misfiring. As a good partner the service provider should have the experience of building and running traditional infrastructure environments and new based on innovative cloud solutions so that they can bring ‘real world’ transformation experience to the partnership. Importantly they must also have the confidence to demonstrate digital leadership and understand of the business and its strategy to add real value to that customer as it undertakes the journey of digital transformation.

Costs can certainly be rationalised along the way. Ultimately with a hybrid system you only pay for what you use. At the end of the day, the peak periods will cost the same, or less, than the off-peak operating expenses. So, with added security, compute power, speed, cost efficiencies and ‘value-added’ services, hybrid IT can provide the agility businesses need.

With these solutions, companies have no need to ‘mind the gap’ between the resources they need and the budget they have. Hybrid IT has the ability to bridge that gap and ensure businesses operate with the agility and speed they need to meet the needs of the competitive modern world.

Written by Jonathan Barrett, Vice President of Sales, CenturyLink, EMEA

Monetizing the Internet of Things: Will All These Connected Devices Pay Off? #CloudWF

Guest Blog with Avangate

Author: Michael Ni, CMO/SVP, Marketing and Products, Avangate

Sometimes it seems like just yesterday that everything was getting “cloud-ified,” from photo sharing to customer relationship management, but the move to the cloud is actually a couple of years old these days. But now that we all have our documents stored in the cloud (and our heads out of the clouds), everybody’s looking for a clear path toward success in the latest trend: the Internet of Things.

Just like the cloud before it, the Internet of Things is now top of mind for software professionals. Its promise has been nascent for a long time: although Dick Tracy’s 2-Way Wrist Radio first appeared in 1946, connected devices like the FitBit and Apple Watch are just starting to get in the hands – or on the wrists – of everyday folks.

With broader adoption of connected devices come both opportunities and challenges. Even the companies that are able to sell IoT hardware successfully find themselves needing to develop and monetize complementary services to help users get the most out of their devices. And software-focused companies that don’t have devices need new a way to get in on the IoT and the billions it’s expected to bring in. That way is through data.

While the IoT started out with connected sensors, it soon became clear that simply sensing data wouldn’t be enough. Just like storing content in the cloud also required building interfaces that made it easy for users to access cloud content, IoT sensors now need to produce data that’s easy for people to find, understand and use. And because IoT data is so valuable (not to mention expensive), there needs to be a way for companies to monetize it. So if wave 1 of the IoT trend involved simply creating the sensors, wave 2 involves monetizing them and the data they create.

As a result, more and more software vendors have started staking a claim in the IoT. At Avangate, we’ve been helping companies like Bitdefender monetize their IoT offerings. Bitdefender offers a “security of things” solution called BOX, a small device that scans for IoT threats on a local WiFi connection. By monitoring the way your smart devices stay connected, BOX finds and protects against possible threats to your connected information. By helping Bitdefender easily monetize its entry into the IoT, including not only the device itself but also associated data, we’re showing the importance and ease of monetizing IoT devices and the data they produce.

And that’s the key: commerce absolutely has to run in the background of every IoT play. No matter how affordable a device is up front, or if streams of data are free for now, devices and data both cost a significant amount to create, maintain, and provide in ways that really work for consumer and business customers. As a result, to truly succeed in the IoT, software companies need to be able to package and sell data derived from connected devices in ways that will benefit other entities as well.

In the end, it’s clear that that the desperate need for IoT data monetization is actually a massive opportunity. Companies are still scrambling to create devices and support data, and not enough entities are thinking about how to monetize it. Those who find themselves able to successfully package and sell information in the IoT era may find themselves enjoying Salesforce style status and riding high on the wave of the future as the IoT truly takes off.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Avangate will be exhibiting at the Cloud World Forum on Stand D48, taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015.

REGISTER YOUR FREE EXHIBITION PASS HERE.

CWF static banner

Risks of SaaS supplier failure & how to effectively mitigate them #CloudWF

Guest Blog with Kemp Little Consulting & NCC Group

The cloud is here to stay and according to a recent survey, organisations are going to be investing more in cloud services to support their core business operations.

But have companies properly considered the risks of SaaS supplier failure if the software is supporting their core processes?

The Kemp Little Consulting (KLC) team has been working with NCC Group to identify some of the risks of SaaS supplier failure and to identify the main problems that end user organisations would need to solve to effectively mitigate these risks.

In the on-premise world, the main way of mitigating against software supplier failure is Software Escrow. This was designed as a means of gaining access to source code for an application in the event of supplier failure.

If a supplier goes bust, there is no short term problem as the application and the business processes supported by the application continue to work and the corporate data remains within the control of the end user.

However, the end user company has a  problem as they will not be able to maintain the application long term and this issue is effectively solved by Software Escrow and related services such as verification.

In the cloud arena, however, the situation is different. If the supplier fails there is potentially an immediate problem of the SaaS service being switched off almost straightaway because the software supplier no longer has the cash to continue to pay for its hosting service or to pay its key staff.

For the end user, this means that they no longer have access to the application; the business process supported by the application can no longer operate and the end user organisation loses access to their data.

The business impact of this loss will vary depending upon the type of application affected:

  • Business Process Critical (e.g. finance, HR, sales and supply chain)
  • Data Critical (e.g. analytics or document collaboration)
  • Utility (e.g. web filtering, MDM, presentational or derived data)

In our research, we found that both suppliers of cloud solutions and end user organisations had not properly thought through the implications of these new risks, nor the services they would require to mitigate against the risk of supplier failure.

The primary concerns that end user customers had were around their business critical data. They were concerned by lack of access to data; loss of data; the risk of compliance breach by losing control of their data and how they might re-build their data into usable form if they could get it back. There was also concern about access to funding to keep the infrastructure running in the SaaS vendor in order to buy time to make alternative arrangements.

They were much less concerned about access to the application or getting access to the source code.

This is understandable as their primary concern would be getting their data back and porting it to another solution to get the business back up and running.

In a separate part of our study, the Kemp Little commercial team looked at the state of the market of the provisions generally found in SaaS contracts to deal with the event of supplier failure.  The team found that even if appropriate clauses were negotiated into the contract at the outset, there may be real difficulties in practically enforcing those terms in an insolvency situation.

End user organisations were more concerned than SaaS suppliers about their capability to deal with all of these problems and were amenable to procuring services from third parties to help them mitigate the risks and solve the problems they could not solve purely by contractual means.

End users were also concerned that many SaaS solutions are initially procured by “Shadow-IT” departments as part of rapid business improvement projects and deployed as pilots where the business risks of failure are low.

However, these solutions can often end up being rolled out globally quite quickly and key parts of the business become dependent upon them by stealth.

It is therefore considered important for companies to develop a deep understanding of their SaaS estate and regularly review the risks of supplier failure and put in place appropriate risk mitigation measures.

KLC recently worked with global information assurance specialist NCC Group to help it enhance the service model for its SaaS Assured service.

This article was originally posted on the Kemp Little Blog and can be found here.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

John Parkinson, Global SaaS Business Leader at NCC Group will be speaking at the Cloud World Forum on 24th June 2015 at 12.45pm.

His talk will take place in Theatre D: Cloud, Data Governance & Cyber Security on ‘Outsourcing to Software as a Service? Don’t Overlook the Critical Commercial Security Risks.’

REGISTER YOUR FREE EXHIBITION PASS HERE.

CWF static banner

The channel must embrace cloud to build for the future #CloudWF

Channel-300x240With cloud acceptance growing, more and more businesses are dipping their toes in the water and trying out cloud based services and applications in a bid to work smarter and lower IT expenditure. But with recent research suggesting that four in ten ICT decision-makers feel their deployment fails to live up to the hype – more needs to be done to ensure cloud migration is a success.

This is where the channel has a vital role to play and can bridge the knowledge gap and help end-users reap the benefits that cloud technology can provide.

With the cloud becoming a mainstream solution for businesses and an integral part of an organisation’s IT strategy, the channel is presented with a huge opportunity. Offering cloud services to the market has the potential to yield high revenues, so it’s vital that the channel takes a realistic approach to adopting cloud within its portfolio, and becomes a trusted advisor to the end user.

We have identified three key reasons why resellers shy away from broadening their offering to encompass cloud for new and existing customers. A common barrier is a simple lack of understanding of the cloud and its benefits. However, if a business is keen to adopt this technology, it is vital that its reseller is able to offer advice and guidance to prevent them looking elsewhere.

Research by Opal back in 2010 found that 40 per cent of resellers admit a sense of ‘fear and confusion’ around cloud computing, with the apprehension to embrace the technology also extending to end users, with 57 per cent reporting uncertainty among their customer bases. This lack of education means they are missing out on huge opportunities for their business. A collaborative approach between the reseller and cloud vendor will help to ensure a seamless knowledge transfer followed by successful partnership and delivery.

The sheer upheaval caused by offering the cloud will see some resellers needing to re-evaluate their own business models and strategies to fulfil the need. Those that are unaccustomed to a service-oriented business model may find that becoming a cloud reseller presents strategic challenges as they rely on out-dated business plans and models that don’t enable this new technology. However, failing to evolve business models could leave resellers behind in the adoption curve, whilst their competitors are getting ahead. Working with an already established partner will help resellers re-evaluate their existing business plans to ensure they can offer cloud solutions to their customers.

Resellers are finding it challenging to provide their customers with quick, scalable cloud solutions due to the fact that moving existing technology services into cloud services can be time consuming, and staff will be focused on working to integrate these within the enterprise. However, this issue can easily be resolved by choosing a trusted cloud provider, and in turn building a successful partnership.

Although resellers will come across barriers when looking at providing their customers with cloud services, these shouldn’t get in the way of progression. In order to enter a successful partnership with a cloud provider, there are some important factors resellers should consider before taking the plunge.

Scalability

Before choosing a prospective partner, resellers need to ensure it has the scalability and technology innovation to provide a simple integration of current IT services into the cloud. Recent research has proved that deploying cloud services from three or more suppliers can damage a company’s business agility. UK businesses state a preference for procuring cloud services from a single supplier for ease of management. It’s important to make sure the chosen provider has the ability to provide one fully encompassed cloud service that can offer everything their customers require.

Brand reputation

Choosing a partner that offers not only a best-of breed private, public and hybrid cloud solution, but also has the ability to provide the reseller with a branded platform will give an extra layer of credibility to the business for not only existing customers, but future ones as well. Resellers are more likely to choose a cloud provider that gives them control over the appearance, as well as support and access to infrastructure of the cloud platform.

Industry experience

It’s vital to ensure the cloud provider has extensive industry experience and knowledge with a proven track record in order to meet the required criteria of scalability and performance. The partner must have the knowledge in order to educate and offer advice to the reseller. If they are able to do so, the reseller can therefore pass this knowledge on to their own customers.

By not offering the cloud, resellers will miss out on vast opportunities and in turn, lose potential revenue as well as new and existing customers. The channel must now embrace the cloud and take advantage of the partnerships available in order to succeed.

Written by Matthew Munson, CTO, Cube52

REGISTER FOR YOUR FREE EXHIBITION PASS HERE!

CWF static banner

Winning with the Internet of Things

Guest Blog with Fujitsu RunMyProcess

Winning with the Internet of Things

shutterstock_265601099Over the last 20 years we have seen successive innovations drive the influence of the Internet into new areas, connecting new kinds of resources, digitizing new interactions and opening up opportunities to challenge the underlying beliefs on which a range of industrial and social activities were based.

Every additional expansion has brought the emergence of new industry leaders – e.g. Amazon, Google, Facebook or Uber – who have used the expansion in connectivity to look at the world with fresh eyes.

Today, the Internet of Things (IoT) promises to drive the boundaries of the Internet further out than ever before, providing connectivity to potentially billions of everyday objects.  The sensors and actuators these objects embed will transform our understanding of real world events and enable us to simultaneously manipulate digital and physical environments in real time.  As connectivity penetrates the real world and transforms the potential of even the smallest and most mundane of everyday objects, huge new opportunities to transform customer experiences across a combination of digital and physical spaces will emerge.

But how do you become a winner in this new environment?  How do you maximize the benefits of these new information sources?  How do you leverage the newly connected things in combination with all of the other digital and human resources that already exist?  How do you go fast enough to stay ahead of the competition?  We believe that there are three principles that can help you drive a successful IoT strategy.

The Internet is the platform

Our first principle states that you can only achieve the full potential of the IoT by stressing the “Internet” over the “Things”.  Despite many waves of technology hype over the years, straightforward connectivity has been the most fundamental driver of transformational change.  It is therefore critical to base your IoT initiatives on existing Internet and Web standards at different layers, leveraging the ubiquitous protocols and patterns of the Internet to maximize connectivity potential and support open innovation.  Protocols such as Bluetooth smart, low power IPv6 and the constrained application protocol (CoAP) are bringing open, web-like access to smart objects while maximising their lifetime through sensible optimisations.

Think small to go large

Our second principle states that meaningful and disruptive innovation on the Internet has rarely been achieved in a top down, centrally planned fashion.  It is the open, chaotic and Darwinian nature of the Internet that has enabled such a high tempo of innovation.  Many discussions of the IoT, however, start with huge, complex and monolithic predictions of smart energy, smart agriculture, smart manufacturing, etc., which are on a scale that has little relevance to your business and which therefore cannot be grasped in terms of the small, actionable steps that you can take to start delivering value today.

To become a winner with the IoT you should ignore large, top down discussions and instead focus on rapidly delivering small, measurable improvements in individual activities and processes relevant to your business and its customers.  The technologies and platforms of the IoT are so low cost and easy to engage with that starting many small experiments is the best way to discover the potential value for your specific business.  In this sense successful approaches to IoT will need to leverage simple technologies and approaches that lower the barrier to entry for each individual case and which do not require the aggregation of many dubious business cases to provide a justification for large scale capital investment.

Connect value in the cloud

Our third principle states that the value of the IoT is meaningless unless you can seamlessly integrate and leverage the data it produces in a way which creates value at scale – for your customers, for your business or for society as a whole.  It’s not about individual sensors or smart devices; it’s about the way in which you combine them with other systems and people to rapidly deliver and evolve compelling, digitally transformed processes and activities.  The IoT should not be seen as a separate technology category – and yet another silo – but simply as an extension of the resources available to you in innovating and optimising your wider digital business processes.

For these reasons a high productivity platform as a service focused on rapid process transformation and integration is an ideal place to unlock the value of the IoT in combination with the wider digital environment.  By abstracting away low level technology, such platforms leave you free to focus on the rapid creation of valuable new digital flows which easily connect the people, systems and sensors necessary to deliver, test and scale systems which transform value for your customers and colleagues.  Most importantly using a high level platform as a service will enable you to deliver, test and scale your new processes faster than competitors who get bogged down in low level technology management of infrastructure and middleware.

And the winner is…

The IoT is bringing huge new opportunities to integrate information spanning the physical and digital worlds, opening up a whole new set of activities for digital disruption.  While grandiose concepts and technical language can make the subject seem overwhelming, use of these three principles can put you in a position to experiment and deliver at extremely low cost.

To prove the point we recently used our own principles to experiment with ways of improving the response to cycling accidents, connecting wearables, sensors, cloud services and mobile devices within a new digital flow.  By using CoAP, focusing on the improvement of a specific outcome and using our PaaS to connect across the whole environment we were able to help a small partner create significant value in just a few days.

The first key step to winning with the IoT is therefore to actually move; the low cost of experimentation and importance of gaining insight into this disruptive new area all make it critical to start shaping your future now – otherwise someone, somewhere will shape it for you.

Ian Thomas

ian thomasIan Thomas is a Fujitsu strategist and thought leader currently serving as Chief Marketing Officer of Fujitsu RunMyProcess.

Ian is an active writer and contributor to both Fujitsu thought leadership content and to external peer-reviewed conferences.  Most recently he has published a range of papers on the evolution of the Web and on the convergence of the Internet of Things, cloud and social infrastructures.  In this context he has also delivered a number of invited talks in various events around the world.

Fujitsu Run My Process

Fujitsu Run My Process is our Visionary Sponsor at Cloud World Forum, taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015 at Olympia Grand in London.

Don’t miss the chance to take advantage of all the knowledge and networking opportunities presented by EMEA’s only content-led Cloud exhibition.

Register for your FREE exhibition pass here!

CWF static banner

 

Exclusive Q&A with Phil Twist, VP, Networks Portfolio Marketing, Nokia

imageedit_9_9603020876

Phil Twist is Vice President for Networks Portfolio Marketing at Nokia and is speaking at Telco Cloud Forum about “Cloud RAN – the next step towards 5G” at 15:30 on 28th April at Radisson Blu Portman in London. In this presentation Phil will talk about how the Cloud RAN architecture will be one of the foundations for the development of the 5G networks. Phil will also share some results of Nokia’s latest activities in the Cloud RAN domain.

 

The Interview…

What is the latest telco cloud project you are working on? 

There is for sure a lot going on right now but I would like to highlight the work he have been doing to make Cloud RAN a viable option for the future and one of the foundations for 5G. As we all know so far the discussion on Telco Cloud has been heavily centered on Core, which is natural due to the immediate gains we can achieve in this domain. However, we cannot lose sight of the additional flexibility and even potential savings that can be achieved when we start to move part of the radio baseband processing into the cloud as well. At Nokia we came up with a layered architecture for Cloud RAN that allows us to reutilize the existing radio network resources, by “cloudifying” then, and also build additional baseband processing capacity on top of a data center infrastructure. With this we can guarantee that processing capacity will always be available wherever it is needed, following the traffic demand. I will be talking about this on my presentation at the event. Of course this is for now an architecture proposal, but the success we have been obtaining in our PoCs with some of our customers are an assurance that sooner than later this concept will turn into a reality in operator’s networks. 

What telcos need to work on to provide best-in-class cloud? 

It is important to keep in mind that while we are focusing on bringing to the telco market the advancements that the IT world achieved with cloud computing, we cannot lose sight of the fact that the requirements are different and much more stringent for telcos. Thus it is important that we bridge this existing gap between what the IT cloud can offer and the requirements of the telco world via more efficient solutions and a network architecture that supports these requirements. Two examples to illustrate this point, most traditional telco applications are extremely latency-sensitive and very data intensive. If we implement a very centralized telco cloud architecture, following the IT cloud concept, we will end up with higher latencies than acceptable and a huge load on the operator backhaul. This means a lot of costs due to all this traffic flowing on the network and even potential technical problems due to latency levels higher than required. To avoid these problems, and others, the telco cloud architecture will have to be much more distributed than a traditional IT cloud. So, instead of a few huge data centers, operators will require more data centers of potentially smaller sizes.

This is just an example of how the requirements are different, and I believe that telcos have to keep in mind that the telco cloud will not be a verbatim copy of the IT clouds. It will require some specific characteristics and the whole industry has to be ready to fulfill those requirements.

What do you think is going to be the next big ‘thing’ in the telco cloud market? 

It seems that 2015 will be the year of Cloud Management. So far the industry has focused on bringing VNFs to the market and we can say that we have achieved a significant degree of success on this. Now it is time to jump from virtualization discussions into more comprehensive Cloud implementations, which necessarily include a wider utilization of Cloud management solutions. So, we will see more launches and implementation cases covering VNF Managers, Orchestrators and even hybrid OSS systems, which are important to guarantee a holistic view of the networks that will combine traditional and cloud elements and ensure ‘telco-grade’ availability and performance.

What is your favourite book or film about the future of technologies?

I don’t have a favourite book – I prefer to see the crowd-source future of technology as it appears in the internet far faster than a snapshot in time captured in a book…

3 DAYS LEFT UNTIL TELCO CLOUD FORUM. REGISTER YOUR FREE PASS NOW!

cloud-telco-646x200


Phil Twist will be speaking at Telco Cloud Forum about “Cloud RAN – the next step towards 5G” at 15:30 on 28th April at Radisson Blu Portman in London.

 

Exclusive Interview with Goran Car, Head of Strategic Business Unit and CTO, ComCloud in Combis #telcocloud

imageedit_9_8129103358ComCloud_Logo-474x325

We interviewed our speaker Goran Car, Head of Strategic Business Unit and CTO ComCloud in Combis, on trends and development which are shaping Cloud market today and tomorrow.

THE INTERVIEW


What is the latest telco cloud project you are working on? Please tell us more about it.

Our Cloud solution ComCloud is a telco oriented, comprehensive and modular Cloud solution which provides facilities for automated provision of Cloud services and infrastructure management via self-service portals.

We are in the process of finishing a project for HT Eronet in Bosnia and Herzegovina and one incumbent telecom within EU. Both are Public Cloud projects with Marketplace and SSO enablers and basic IaaS services. In coming months it will be extended with additional services and different SaaS offerings.

Within the projects we tried to give the most that Cloud can give, taking into account customer wishes, of course.

For more information visit my lecture ‘Where Have All the Marketplaces Gone’. I will talk about best practice examples, guidelines and ideas how to utilize marketplace, as the most common centerpiece of Cloud selling strategies, in the best, most appealing and market-specific way, how to utilize marketplace in geographically-bound markets and how to make successful go-to-market strategy and maximize potential of Cloud services.

What telcos need to work on to provide best-in-class cloud?

We believe that user experience is crucial. Customer must be provided with best-in-class experience. Consumer is conditio sine qua non.

Consumerization is a very well-known trend, but it must be taken to next level in providing (business) Cloud services. Seamless integration of Marketplace and services, responsive web, subject-action relationship instead of classic action-subject web are all crucial elements for providing modern Cloud services. Technology is available to everybody, so what we feel will drive future Cloud business are experience and bundled offers.

We were thinking about trends and we have developed a solution which offers extensive customer experience, enabling service providers to efficiently distribute their Cloud services, and users to effectively self-manage them. Customers are thus able to manage their resources more promptly and thoroughly in order to adapt expenses to their actual needs. At the same time, the system provides service providers with an opportunity to expand into new markets more easily, removing all physical barriers which prevented them to do so until now.

What do you think is going to be the next big ‘thing’ in the telco cloud market?

I believe that there will be greater way of interworking, both between different Cloud services and customer’s internal IT. Moreover, customers will have the possibility to move between services more easily and configure more than one service together in greater solution.

For instance, we are experimenting with setting up virtual network service, being able to connect different services by usage of self-service portal.  It is important to constantly think of the needs of end users and to think innovatively.

What is your favorite book or film about the future of technologies?

It might not be so much about future of technology, but I really like Brian Green’s “The Elegant Universe”. It sets a theory, that when and if proved and detailed, it can open a completely new view on building things and technology that was once considered impossible.

REGISTER YOUR FREE PASS HERE.


 

cloud-telco-646x200

Goran Car will held a lecture ‘Where Have All the Marketplaces Gone’ on Wednesday, 29th of April, at 12:40 in Ballroom, Radisson Blu Portman, London.

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: