Posts tagged ‘Cloud service providers’

Telco Cloud 2015 Survey Results #Telcocloud

Hello Telco Cloud community,

Exciting news – we are now finalising the agenda for the 2015 Telco Cloud Forum. For the past month I have been researching with the industry to identify challenges and trends that the Telco Cloud community is facing currently when launching cloud services. After speaking to over 50 top industry experts it has become clear that there are definitely key common trends amongst telcos, that we’ll be covering in the 2015 agenda. Let me tell you a bit more about them….

Virtualisation is the big topic that everybody is talking about!  As you might remember, last year we had a stream devoted to technical innovations, including virtualisation. It went so well that you’ve asked us to expand it in 2015. So watch out for a whole stream on new trends, interesting case studies and exciting tools on NFV, SDN and network virtualisation. We will bring all the relevant solutions and Telco cloud virtualisation practical case studies. You will walk away knowing how virtualisation is changing the game for Telcos’ cloud business?

Not surprisingly, cloud security appeared to be another major topic. Over 70% of my calls mentioned that security is becoming progressively more important to Telcos looking to win in the cloud space.  Building a strong holistic approach towards a wide range of security problems is ‘a must’ for Telcos. It’s not an IT service anymore, it’s Telcos’ USP.

Since we launched the Forum over 5 years ago we’ve been covering Go-to-Market strategies or in other words ‘How to Sell’ and ‘What to Sell’.  The 2015 Telco Cloud Forum will be covering this crucial and essential topic from all the possible angles. We will delve into the deepest details of Business Models and Go-to-Market strategies. Have a look yourself at some of the sessions we have lined up:

  • Oxford Style Debates: What do Telcos Sell Best?
  • SaaS and other XaaS: Challenges to Overcome and the Right Decisions to Make
  • Hybrid Models – Delivering Best-in-class High-performance and High-Availability
  • M2M Opportunities for Telco Cloud
  • Workshop: Advancing SaaS Business Models: Enhancing Product Portfolio
  • Unified Communication as an Essential Business Reality
  • 360 Degree Panel on How to Sell the Cloud? Hear from all parties involved in selling the Cloud: each panellist will be a representative from each market player: Telco, System Integrator, Cloud experts and Cloud Service Providers
  • The SME as the Number 1 Customer Group that Telcos can Grow their Revenue From
  • How ODEON & UCI Cinemas Group Are Developing their ICT Strategy Implementing Cloud Based Services
  • Utilizing New Channels to Attract Existing or Adjacent Customer Segments
  • New and Enhanced Revenue Streams from Enterprise Mobility
  • Panel: What are the Skillsets Required to Successfully Sell Cloud – Learning A, B, C Once Again

Finally, there is no way we can avoid the hot topic of the moment, Big Data and Analytics. Over the past few years Big Data has evolved from being a buzz word to something Telcos are increasingly implementing and using when improving customer experience and operational efficiency. The main challenges that operators told me they are facing are all about maximizing existing Data in the Cloud.  Knowing which privileges Telcos have and learning about practical lessons and pain points of Big Data implementation are the top priorities for Telcos now.

(more…)

Free Podcast: A moment with Lincoln Lincoln, EMC #cloudasia

Looking forward to the Cloud Asia Forum in three weeks’ time, we spoke to Lincoln Lincoln, Practice Manager, Cloud Service Providers, Emerging Markets APJ at EMC, Headline Sponsor at the event, about “The Transformational Wave of Cloud in APAC“.

podcast-banner-lincoln
In this podcast we discuss:

  • How this transformational wave is affecting the dynamics of some traditional vendors
  • The opportunity that this brings for service providers in Asia
  • The interesting partnerships he is seeing in the Cloud space
  • Finally, given these dynamic changes, how can consumers best equip themselves to leverage all the benefits of Cloud?

You can listen to the podcast here, and discuss these issues with Lincoln (and all of our expert speakers) in person at the Cloud Asia Forum, where enterprises can claim a complimentary pass.

25 Ways to Become a More Intelligent Consumer of Cloud Services

Five principles for cloud services adoption and 20 secrets of project success

Steve Hodgkinson is Ovum’s APAC Research Director, and in this report he summarizes five principles and 20 things that enterprise and public sector agencies should consider to make a success of cloud services procurement and implementation.

Recommendations for enterprises

We recommend that agency executives use this report to inform and challenge their thinking about how to approach cloud services adoption. There is a wide range of experience levels across agencies. Some agencies have extensive experience of cloud services adoption and are already experts, while others have little experience, and will benefit from reading and discussing the 25 ways in which they may become more intelligent consumers of cloud services.

Readers are encouraged to provide feedback directly to the author if they disagree with the 25 points or have additional insights to offer.

Recommendations for vendors

We recommend that cloud service providers consider how their service offerings and approach to engaging with prospects and clients align with the 25 points. In particular, vendors should note the points around the imperatives for agencies to test drive solutions and have a “prenuptial agreement” for data and a plan B. Although it may seem counterintuitive, the best way to make agency executives feel comfortable about “getting into” a cloud service is to make it easy for them to both “get in” and “get out.” The best way to win and maintain a customer relationship is to focus on delivering an affordable service that meets “cloudy is as cloudy does” expectations.

You can download this report from the Cloud Asia website. The 5th Annual Cloud World Forum Asia is taking place at the Sheraton Hotel & Towers in Hong Kong from 24-26 November 2014. Join 500+ IT decision makers, application developers, mobile network operators, operators, ISVs, Cloud Service Providers and technology specialists in data analytics and consumer insight, application management, virtualisation, system integration, mobile device management, security, business intelligence, CRM, ERM and ERP solutions.

Cloud-Asia-150x150

Three quarters of businesses still find cloud performance assurances lacking #Cloudwf

Join the discussion with the The Cloud World Series in London, Africa, Sao Paulo, Berlin, Hong Kong and USA!

CLOUD-Series-LogoCLOUD-WF-Logo

Are you an enterprise IT professional? Do you agree? Join the discussion today!

A report published Wednesday that includes survey responses from over 740 senior IT professionals globally suggests that the majority of IT professionals believe typical service level agreements (SLAs) built around availability and performance fail to address the risks of moving and managing applications in the cloud.

The survey, commissioned by Compuware and carried out by Research In Action, found 79 per cent of survey respondents believed their SLAs were “too simplistic” and failed to address key risks associated with moving and managing cloud apps.

“Entrusting mission critical business applications that drive revenue and critical business processes require ultimate trust and accountability in a cloud provider,” said Michael Masterson, director of cloud solutions for Compuware APM’s business unit. “

Vanity metrics like simple uptime do not capture well-known issues such as ‘noisy neighbours,’ which can be detrimental to traditional enterprise apps that were not designed to scale and fail horizontally.”

The report confirms that there is still a great deal of fear, uncertainty and doubt among enterprise IT professionals when it comes to cloud.

Nearly three quarters (73 per cent) said they believe their cloud providers could be hiding problems at an infrastructure or platform level that impact on the performance of applications. 62 per cent said limited visibility into the infrastructure made it difficult to both monitor their application performance and troubleshoot problems in the cloud.

“The truth behind performance is what the end customer or user feels – that is all that really matters,” Masterson told Business Cloud News. “The vendor should be responsive, but the general rule seems to be innocent until proven guilty, with fingers usually pointing back to the application or database vs the infrastructure.”

“Customers that encounter this often discover it on their own, then blame the provider for poor performance, when the reality is that it’s another tenant over consuming shared resources.”

Masterson explained that the results suggest an underlying problem with the way cloud service providers often make guarantees on their services.

“There are two primary issues with “technical guarantees”. First, if everyone tries to grab maximum rates at once. It’s like a run on the bank and very quickly you’ll discover that the provider (the bank) doesn’t actually have all that reserve bandwidth (the cash) on hand. Instead, they’ve made assumptions and provisioned based on estimated usage and normalised workloads – thereby offering you capacity at a discount compared to dedicated hardware,” he said.

But “users are not typically normally distributed – they have spikes and troughs in demand. Software is inherently virtual and should be able to match the demand with appropriate supply – much more so than tradition fixed goods and complex logistics and fulfilment systems. Yet they run into the same bottlenecks, often with catastrophic failure,” he added.

logo

Hybrid clouds will continue to rise to top of enterprise agenda

Ovum-logo-135

Summary

Cloud service providers and consumers approach hybrid clouds from a public as well as a private cloud perspective. The objective for both is to run workloads where it makes the most sense at a technology and/or business level. While hybrid clouds’ center of gravity will shift toward public clouds, it will do so quite slowly as enterprises increasingly mix and match the variety of hybrid cloud options available on the market, from connective to blended and accretive hybrid cloud. For more details see the 2014 Trends to Watch: From Private to Hybrid Clouds report that details not only hybrid clouds but also private cloud trends.

From public versus private to public and private

On the one hand, public cloud vendors offer a variety of hybrid options to meet various requirements in areas such are security or performance. On the other, private clouds were always supposed to be hybrid in the first place. While many see private clouds as a synonym for internal clouds, this is just a starting point, not the end game. Private clouds are meant to become hybrid and reach out to public cloud services as cloud computing turns IT departments from IT service providers to IT service brokers. The key question is not “should I continue to invest in developing my in-house IT capabilities (private cloud) or should I move to public cloud services?” but “how do I weave internal and external, cloud and non-cloud, services together to deliver the right business outcome and user experience?”

Hybrid clouds’ center of gravity will slowly shift toward public clouds

In this context, hybrid clouds’ center of gravity seems to shift from private to public clouds. While there is a lot of anecdotal evidence illustrating this shift, it is much slower and more complicated than the anecdotes and those eager to build on them would like many to believe. The danger is to oversimplify, not only by wrongly looking at private and public clouds as opposites, but also by misunderstanding the increasingly complexity and continuing evolution of the hybrid middle.

Hybrid clouds will remain a multi-faceted, rapidly evolving, phenomenon

Hybrid clouds are usually defined as the integration of private clouds with public ones (connective hybrid cloud in Ovum parlance). Ovum (like many others) does so in surveys, for example. However, we do not believe it useful to limit hybrid clouds to such a narrow definition because, like cloud computing itself, the hybrid cloud phenomenon is multi-faceted and rapidly evolving. In addition to connective hybrid cloud, Ovum distinguishes between blended and accretive hybrid clouds, with specific trends to keep an eye on in each of these categories.

Connective hybrid clouds support a variety of “bursting”, “integration”, and/or “transfer” use cases. Cloud bursting has yet to take off in any meaningful way, but on-premise applications are increasingly reaching out to off-premise ones. The reverse scenario is also gaining momentum as the hybrid cloud’s center of gravity shifts to public clouds. In parallel, with the rise of cloud management platforms (CMPs), enterprises either repackage or rebuild VMs, increasingly in the context of whole applications rather than application components, to move them from private to public clouds, and vice versa. This scenario requires increasingly sophisticated VM/application portfolio management capabilities to figure out where to move what to achieve the required business outcome(s).

In addition to connecting private and public clouds, hybrid clouds also blend their characteristics, giving rise to shared private clouds, virtual private clouds, as well as shared virtual private clouds. Virtual private clouds, namely private clouds on top of a public one, have so far been the most successful blended hybrid option, so much so that they actually outnumber internal private clouds. Many expected shared private clouds, also known as community clouds, to quickly take off as a midway option between fully private and fully public clouds, but this has yet to happen. The “hybrid of hybrid” notion of shared virtual private cloud has so far proved even less popular than that of shared private clouds. We expect it to take off, however, as shared private clouds gather momentum.

Over the years, large vendors such as IBM, Microsoft, and Oracle have added to their original offerings to come up with combined (IaaS, PaaS, and/or SaaS) offerings that we define as accretive hybrid public clouds. We expect this trend to continue, with smaller vendors following suit, especially when it comes to adding PaaS to IaaS and SaaS. Cloud brokers, both internal and external to enterprises, are also increasing in number and combining IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS components.

Appendix

Further reading

2014 Trends to Watch: From Private to Hybrid Clouds, IT022-000007 (March 2014)
2014 Trends to Watch: Public Clouds, IT022-000008, (March 2014)
2014 Trends to Watch: Cloud Computing, IT022-000006 (February 2014)
2014 Trends to Watch: Cloud Services, IT019-003310 (January 2014)

Methodology

  • Vendor events and analyst briefings.
  • Vendor meetings and technology assessments.
  • Interviews with end users.

Authors

Laurent Lachal, Senior Analyst, Ovum Software
Laurent.lachal@ovum.com

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: