Posts tagged ‘cloud platform’

Top 5 Sources of Cloud Data Loss #CloudWF

Guest Blog with eFolder

“But it’s in the cloud, isn’t it backed up already?”

Author: Trace Ronning, Content Marketing Manager, eFolder

In 2015, businesses have continued their rapid adoption of cloud/SaaS applications with no signs of slowing down. A study completed by the Aberdeen Group concluded that 80% of businesses use at least one cloud application. Usage has also increased. In 2014, 51% of IT workloads took place in the cloud, marking it the first year that the cloud owned a majority of IT workloads according to Silicon Angle.

The advantages of the cloud are clear, with most companies experiencing greater employee productivity, mobility, and improved collaboration as a result of adopting cloud applications.

There is, however, one major issue that the cloud has not eliminated for organizations: data loss. While the inherent securities of SaaS services, such as Office 365, Google Apps, Salesforce, and Box are minimizing outages and random data loss, human error is still the primary source of lost data. In 2013, 32% of companies using cloud services reported losing cloud data, an overwhelming majority of which came as a direct result of human intervention.

How exactly are businesses losing this cloud data, and how can they prevent it from happening again? Let’s take a dive into the top five sources of cloud data loss and find out.

1. User Error

We know that humans are not perfect. Checking in as the top reason for cloud data loss is user error, which accounts for 64% of all cloud data loss. The two primary examples of user error include accidental deletion or accidentally overwriting a file. We all make mistakes now and again, so it is ill-advised to operate under the assumption that by adopting cloud applications, people will become immune to the human condition and never lose a file again.

2. Hackers

Hackers, defined as outsiders who get into the system with nefarious intent, are responsible for 13% of all cloud data loss. As cloud adoption and usage has grown, so has a hacker’s willingness to attack companies of all sizes, not just giant enterprise businesses, such as Sony or Home Depot. As of now, 50% of data breaches occur at companies with fewer than 1,000 employees, with the most common type of attacks consisting of a hacker breaking into an organization’s instance or acquiring administrator credentials. Malicious activity such as this often results in sensitive data being compromised, jeopardizing the customers of the company, as well as its ability to keep its doors open and continue doing business.

3. Closing an account

At 10%, the third most common kind of cloud data loss occurs when a business closes an account. We define this action as a user de-provisioning a user within a cloud application or discontinuing the service. Without deploying a backup service to save former users’ data or a solution that helps migrate data from one application to another, respectively, organizations run the risk of losing data in transition phases.

4. Malicious Delete

Think your business is immune to frustrated employees going rogue? Think again. 7% of all cloud data loss occurs when an employee intentionally deletes files or folders. This type of deletion is often initiated by an unhappy employee or a recently terminated employee who has retained access to organizational cloud applications and data. At all levels of a business there are examples of employees who don’t value company data as much as IT managers or executives do, especially in roles with high-turnover.

5. Third-Party Software

The fifth most common reason for cloud data loss is the unexpected result of using a third-party software on one of your SaaS applications. Occasionally, a data overwrite or deletion will occur when running third-party software. A classic example is a Salesforce administrator running Demand Tools and inaccurately identifying a prospect as a duplicate account and permanently deleting that prospect’s record. Third-party software is generally used to make daily use of the most common business applications easier, but sometimes the side-effects include the loss of important data.

How

You may be reading this blog post and thinking, “But if my data is in the cloud, can’t I just easily recover it if a file is deleted or overwritten? Why should I be concerned with cloud data backup?”

There is a common misconception that data is retained in the cloud forever, but that is simply not the case. Most cloud applications do keep some type of “recycling bin,” but this bin often has a storage limit, automatic purge function, or can be manually cleared.

Automated, off-site backup to a second cloud location is the most reliable way to ensure that the sensitive data you store in the cloud is recovered, regardless of which cloud data disaster hits your organization. By employing a solution that allows for full-text search across multiple cloud applications, direct, point-in-time data restores into the cloud application of choice, and a military-grade off-site backup location, your organization can both protect data, and empower IT admins to better use that data on a daily basis.

Don’t let cloud data loss become the problem you didn’t know you had. Make it the problem you know you that you’ll never have with cloud-to-cloud backup.

eFolder

Bryan Forrimageedit_2_7919550340ester, Senior VP of Sales at eFolder will be speaking on the 25th June at 12.35pm in Theatre D at the Cloud World Forum about the Top 5 Sources of Cloud Data Loss & How to Protect Your Organisation.

Don’t miss the chance to take advantage of all the knowledge and networking opportunities presented by EMEA’s only content-led Cloud exhibition.

 

REGISTER FOR YOUR FREE EXHIBITION PASS HERE!

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ISO 27018 and protecting personal information in the cloud: a first year scorecard #CloudWF

ISO 27018 has been around for a year – but is it effective?

Source: Business Cloud NewsData-protection

A year after it was published,  – the first international standard focusing on the protection of personal data in the public cloud – continues, unobtrusively and out of the spotlight, to move centre stage as the battle for cloud pre-eminence heats up.

At the highest level, this is a competitive field for those with the longest investment horizons and the deepest pockets – think million square foot data centres with 100,000+ servers using enough energy to power a city.  According to research firm Synergy, the cloud infrastructure services market – Infrastructure as a Service (Iaas), Platform as a Services (PaaS) and private and hybrid cloud – was worth $16bn in 2014, up 50 per cent on 2013, and is predicted to grow 30 per cent to over $21bn in 2015. Synergy estimated that the four largest players accounted for 50 per cent of this market, with Amazon at 28 per cent, Microsoft at 11 per cent, IBM at 7 per cent and Google at 5 per cent.  Of these, Microsoft’s 2014 revenues almost doubled over 2013, whilst Amazon’s and IBM’s were each up by around half.

Significantly, the proportion of computing sourced from the cloud compared to on-premise is set to rise steeply: enterprise applications in the cloud accounted for one fifth of the total in 2014 and this is predicted to increase to one third by 2018.

This growth represents a huge increase year on year in the amount of personal data (PII or personally identifiable information) going into the cloud and the number of cloud customers contracting for the various and growing types of cloud services on offer. but as the cloud continues to grow at these startling rates, the biggest inhibitor to cloud services growth – trust about security of personal data in the cloud – continues to hog the headlines.

Under data protection law, the Cloud Service Customer (CSC) retains responsibility for ensuring that its PII processing complies with the applicable rules.  In the language of the EU Data Protection Directive, the CSC is the data controller.  In the language of ISO 27018, the CSC is either a PII principal (processing her own data) or a PII controller (processing other PII principals’ data).

Where a CSC contracts with a Cloud Service Provider (CSP), Article 17 the EU Data Protection Directive sets out how the relationship is to be governed. The CSC must have a written agreement with the CSP; must select a CSP providing ‘sufficient guarantees’ over the technical security measures and organizational measures governing PII in the Cloud service concerned; must ensure compliance with those measures; and must ensure that the CSP acts only on the CSC’s instructions.

As the pace of migration to the cloud quickens, the world of data protection law continues both to be fragmented – 100 countries have their own laws – and to move at a pace driven by the need to mediate all competing interests rather than the pace of market developments.

In this world of burgeoning cloud uptake, ISO 27018 is proving effective at bridging the gap between the dizzying pace of Cloud market development and the slow and uncertain rate of legislative change by providing CSCs with a workable degree of assurance in meeting their data protection law responsibilities.  Almost a year on from publication of the standard, Microsoft has become the first major CSP (in February 2015) to achieve ISO 27018 certification for its Microsoft Azure (IaaS/PaaS), Office 365 (PaaS/Saas) and Dynamics CRM Online (SaaS) services (verified by BSI, the British Standards Institution) and its Microsoft Intune SaaS services (verified by Bureau Veritas).

In the context of privacy and cloud services, ISO 27018 builds on other information security standards within the IS 27000 family. This layered, interlocking approach is proving supple enough in practice to deal with the increasingly wide array of cloud services. For example, it is not tied to any particular kind of cloud service and, as Microsoft’s certifications show, applies to IaaS (Azure), PaaS (Azure and Office 365) and SaaS (Office 365 and Intune). If, as shown in the graphic below, you consider computing services as a stack of layered elements ranging from networking (at the bottom of the stack) up through equipment and software to data (at the top), and that each of these elements can be carried out on premise or from the cloud (from left to right), then ISO 27018 is flexible enough to cater for all situations across the continuum.

Cloud-licenses-1024x528Indeed, the standard specifically states at Paragraph 5.1.1:

“Contractual agreements should clearly allocate responsibilities between the public cloud PII processor [i.e. the CSP], its sub-contractors and the cloud service customer, taking into account the type of cloud service in question (e.g. a service of an IaaS, PaaS or SaaS category of the cloud computing reference architecture).  For example, the allocation of responsibility for application layer controls may differ depending on whether the public cloud PII processor is providing a SaaS service or rather is providing a PaaS or IaaS service upon which the cloud service customer can build or layer its own applications.”

Equally, CSPs will generally not know whether their CSCs are sending PII to the cloud and, even if they do, they are unlikely to know whether or not particular data is PII. Here, another strength of ISO 27018 is that it applies regardless of whether particular data is, or is not, PII: certification simply assures the CSC that the service the CSP is providing is suitable for processing PII in relation to the performance by the CSP of its PII legal obligations.

Perhaps the biggest practical boon to the CSC however is the contractual certainty that ISO 27018 certification provides.  As more work migrates to the cloud, particularly in the enterprise space, the IT procurement functions of large customers will be following structured processes in order to meet the requirements of their business and, in certain cases, their regulators. In their requests for information, proposals and quotations from prospective CSPs, CSCs now have a range of interlocking standards including ISO 27018 to choose from in their statements of requirements for a particular Cloud procurement.  As well as short-circuiting the need for CSCs to spend time in writing up detailed specifications of their own requirements, verified compliance with these standards for the first time provides meaningful assurance and protection from risk around most aspects of cloud service provision. Organisations running competitive tenders can benchmark bidding CSPs against each other on their responses to these requirements, and then include as binding commitments the obligations to meet the requirements of the standards concerned in the contract when it is let.

In the cloud contract lifecycle, the flexibility provided by ISO 27018 certification, along with the contract and the CSP’s policy statements, goes beyond this to provide the CSC with a framework to discuss with the CSP on an ongoing basis the cloud PII measures taken and their adequacy.

In its first year, it is emerging that complying, and being seen to comply, with ISO 27018 is providing genuine assurance for CSCs in managing their data protection legal obligations.  This reassurance operates across the continuum of cloud services and through the procurement and contract lifecycle, regardless of whether or not any particular data is PII.  In customarily unobtrusive style, ISO 27018 is likely to go on being a ‘win’ for the standards world, cloud providers and their customers, and data protection regulators and policy makers around the world.

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………Visit the Cloud World Forum taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015 at Olympia Grand in London.

Don’t miss the chance to take advantage of all the knowledge and networking opportunities presented by EMEA’s only content-led Cloud exhibition.

Register you free exhibition pass here.

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The real world cloud is hybrid, bimodal, multi-platform and difficult…#CloudWF

Guest Blog with NTT Communications

Which Apps? Which Cloud?
5 Findings About The Real World Cloud

The CIO of today is under more pressure than ever to balance the new with the old. He/she must embrace new digital possibilities for creating business value and simultaneously maintain a complex set of existing applications that are an organisation’s foundation. A critical factor that can help a CIO navigate this bi-modal tightrope is an assessment of the application estate and the impact of digitalisation on it.

To aid with the above and to establish the current benchmark for the application estate,  NTT Com commissioned independent research to understand which infrastructure is best suited to host which kind of applications in the real world. Further, the research aimed to ascertain if there was a correlation between the characteristics of an application (type, maturity, adoption rates) and its suitability for the cloud or the corporate data centre.

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The responses showed that there are no definitive answers to these questions, but highlighted some interesting trends. Here are some of the key findings from the survey that can give a layer of clarity when making decisions about cloud.

  1. The reality – many apps many clouds:

    NTT Com’s study found that on average, an organisation runs hundred applications. In some sectors like telecoms and finance this number doubles. Organisations use four different cloud platforms on average and over 80% of respondents expect the number of cloud platforms to increase.

  2. Which Apps go Where – no definitive answers:

    The survey responses showed a lack of consensus on which applications are best suited to which environments. This did not mean a lack of faith in the cloud though. Respondents made it clear that they were comfortable deploying core business applications in the cloud.

  3. Cloud platforms – the winners and losers:
    While there is no clear choice on which platform is the most adopted, nearly 48% voted for IaaS in some form (Private and Public) making it the most favoured among the respondents. On the other hand, there weren’t many takers for PaaS, showing that PaaS providers still need to build confidence for this platform in enterprises.

    4. Top cloud benefits – scalability and cost:
    With 50% of respondents citing it, scalability emerged, unsurprisingly as the top cloud benefit, followed by cost (Capex and Opex) savings at 47%. These point out that despite the confusion around cloud platforms, organisations are clear about the benefits of cloud.

  4. Have Cloud, will move:
    Nearly 90% of respondents cited that they will migrate their most important application from the corporate datacentre to the cloud at some point. 60% believe this will happen within 2 years. What does this mean? The question is not “To cloud or not to cloud”, but when, how and how much.

In summary,  NTT Com’s findings show that the cloud ecosystem is complex and is affected by numerous factors such as the company type, industry, scale, size, and location. The real world cloud is hybrid, bimodal, multi-platform and difficult. There are no broad answers that can apply to all.

The CIO of today, when formulating strategies, must take into account all of these factors and aim for a realistic balance between achieving the benefits of cloud and managing its complexities. In doing so, he/she can create a winning strategy unique to the needs of his/her organisation.

To read the full report go here.  An infographic highlighting the key facts and figures of the report is available here.  Join the conversation on Twitter with the hashtag #realworldcloud.

NTT Communications

NTT Communications is our Headline Sponsor at Cloud World Forum, taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015 at Olympia Grand in London.

Don’t miss the chance to take advantage of all the knowledge and networking opportunities presented by EMEA’s only content-led Cloud exhibition.

Register for your FREE exhibition pass here!

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Fujitsu partners with Equinix on Singapore cloud datacentre #cloudasia

Source: Business Cloud News

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Fujitsu has set up another datacentre in Singapore this week amidst what it sees as increasing demand for cloud services in Singapore and neighbouring countries in the Asia-Pacific region.

The datacentre, hosted in Equinix’s western Singapore facility, will host Fujitsu’s portfolio of cloud services and offer a number of new connectivity features “currently under development” that would allow enterprises to federate with other cloud platforms.

The recently announced datacentre is Fujitsu’s third in Singapore, and it already operates over 100 worldwide; the company’s cloud services are hosted from six datacentres globally.

The company said it chose to add another datacentre in Singapore because of its strategic location and attractiveness to large multinational firms.

“In recent years, companies increasingly are embracing cloud services as a platform to support the accelerating pace of business in Asia. In particular, because of its low level of natural disaster related risk and its position as an international network hub with reliable broadband network lines, Singapore is often chosen as the location for integrated systems operations by many companies that are pursuing multinational business expansion,” the company said in a statement.

Fujitsu is the latest cloud vendor to view Singapore as a relatively untapped market for cloud services. This week CenturyLink, which recently expanded its managed services presence in China, added public cloud nodes to one of its Singapore datacentres.

Apart from locally established multinationals and the booming financial services sector, the Singapore Government has also shown itself to be looking to invest more in both using cloud services and growing usage of cloud platforms in the region.

According to Parallels, local SMBs are also hopping onto cloud platforms with reasonable pace. The firm believes the SMB cloud services market in Singapore is projected to hit $916M in 2017, with a three-year CAGR of 21 per cent.


 

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Hear more about Cloud Asia at the Cloud Asia Forum taking place on 8th & 9th December 2015 at Mira Hong Kong!

PRE-REGISTER HERE.

Join the APAC Cloud Industry’s Leadership recognition awards #Cloudasia

Following the successful Cloud World Series Awards which took place in London this year, the Cloud Asia Awards are a celebration of the drive, innovation and hard work in the global cloud computing industry.

This year’s awards will take place the evening of day one and will feature 4 categories, recognising services from across the Cloud ecosystem. Similarly to the Cloud World Series Awards the Cloud Asia Awards will be judged by world-class experts whom will be announced shortly so watch this space!

Once you’ve signed up to attend the show, if you’d like to add your company’s branding next to the list of technology trailblazers entering the awards, click here and find out more about how to enter!

Entry deadline is Monday 13th October 2014!

500+ senior IT decision makers will come together across 3 days at the Sheraton Hotel in Kong Kong where the Awards ceremony will take place. Meet with 50 + Sponsors and Exhibitors who will showcase quick updates and  LIVE software building demos and deployments!  Visit the stands you want and only see the newest solutions you need (no tiresome product pitches at Cloud Asia!).

read more about Cloud Asia >>

 Winners will enjoy…

A Winner’s Trophy presented at the Cloud Asia Awards networking evening on the 25th of November 2014
A Winner’s photo of the presentation of the Awards
Inclusion in the Cloud Asia Awards Winners press release
Being featured on the Cloud Asia Awards Winner’s website
Being featured in a Cloud Asia Awards Winners HTML posted to the full Cloud Asia mailing list
Being able to use “Winners of Cloud Asia Awards” logo and icon on their own promotional materials.

In a constantly evolving industry, with so many cutting-edge Cloud providers and new entrants to the market, competition at this year’s awards is set to be the most fierce yet!

Don’t miss out on this unique opportunity to recognise excellence and progress in the sector!

Enter here today >>

Featuring 4 key categories:

-Best Cloud Service
-Best Cloud Application
-Best Cloud Platform
-Best Cloud Security Solution

Entry deadline is Monday 13th October 2014!

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Telefónica Group CIO: Using cloud to regain ground lost to OTT players #telcocloud

Source: Buisness Cloud News

With operations in 24 countries, over 120,000 employees globally, Telefónica Group, one of the largest telecommunications companies in the world, is looking to put at IT at the core of everything that it does in order to compete globally in an industry currently in the throes of a digital revolution. Phil Jordan, group chief information officer at Telefónica tells BCN that cloud is at the centre of how the company plans to regain terrain lost to over-the-top (OTT) players, make its core mobile and fixed line operations more flexible and scalable, and enable it to provide next generation digital services.

“IT is a strategic differentiator for the company, but it hasn’t always been perceived that way, even when I became CIO,” says Jordan, who took up his current role at Telefónica in 2011. Context, he says, is essential to understanding why this perception proliferated within the company and throughout the telecoms sector more broadly, and why the operator is currently spearheading so many new digital initiatives.

“We’re a business operating in an industry that failed to innovate fast enough, which has probably created the opportunity for the Vibers and the WhatsApps of the world, and I think we’ve failed to innovate in our own product because, like a lot of businesses, we felt we didn’t need to because we were making lots of money,” he explains. “You get complacent.”

The situation is cause for concern, not just at Telefónica but for most telcos, which could be losing up to $386bn cumulatively by 2018 to OTT players like Skype and WhatsApp according to research and consulting firm Ovum.

It is within this context that Telefónica has sought to become more digital, an effort complicated by its continued growth and a series of acquisitions. As one of the biggest and oldest telcos with lots of fixed line heritage, it has accumulated a very complex IT systems landscape over the years, which Jordan says the company is constantly trying to simplify.

“One of our big challenges as a federation of separate businesses is that we have to remove complexity. We’ve managed to overcomplicate the industry, our business, and our internal systems over the last 20 years,” he says.

But the biggest challenge, he explains, is inextricably linked to what Jordan believes is the biggest opportunity for the operator: data.

“We’ve always had a tremendous amount of data, we’ve always been a big data company, but how do you derive insights from the data? Because of systems fragmentation, we’ve struggled to derive real insight and particularly global insight through the use of data. Getting a 360 degree view of our customers is actually a much bigger challenge for us than working out how to leverage analytics and big data systems.”

Driving core platforms and systems change at Telefónica

Because of the way the industry grew, Jordan explains, the lack of recognition in how important IT was moving forward, “we’ve ended up with such fragmented systems that they don’t really lend themselves well to forming that 360 degree customer view. But that’s a problem because data is the new battleground and the future differentiator for our industry.”

“We’ve gone from having almost 7,000 systems three years ago, down to 4,200 now, so we’re slowly simplifying our estate.”

The company’s SaaS and virtualisation strategies are central to this process. Telefónica is a large user of Office 365, SAP SuccessFactors and Salesforce among other big name cloud services. It deploys these services from a private cloud platform hosted in its massive datacentre in Spain, which at a whopping 65,700 m2 is one of the largest in Europe, dwarfed only by Portugal Telecom’s recently announced Covilha datacentre.

By centralising these services the company is able to leverage its cloud platform and generate operational efficiencies through a shared services approach, while ensuring local standards and businesses processes can be maintained where necessary, and by purchasing commoditised solutions off-the-shelf the company has enjoyed significant cost benefits.

The operator has also virtualised a number of its internal platforms, which allows the company to sweat its existing assets and make its datacentre resources more scalable and flexible.

By the end of this year Jordan’s team will have virtualised about 40 per cent of the group’s IT servers, and the company is now taking this approach to the most mission-critical system of all – the core network, through network function virtualisation (NFV). Along with global CTO Enrique Blanco and his team the company is working on a proof of concept for a virtual radio access network (vRAN). Work on a virtual Evolved Packet Core, vIMS, vDNS and vDHCP is also set to conclude this year as the operator looks to virtualise 30 per cent of all new infrastructure by 2016.

Virtualising these system will allow Telefónica to deploy network assets in a way that allows them to be managed centrally and deployed globally, while making them more flexible, scalable and less expensive to acquire and maintain than legacy networking hardware.

The operator has taken a slightly different approach with its business support and operational support systems. Telefónica recognises the need to transform BSS and OSS in order to have these digital capabilities and a foundation for the future. But it’s not consolidating these systems or putting one BSS or OSS across the group because it’s just not practical or doable across many group companies, Jordan explains.

“We are doing greenfield BSS implementations in 14 separate countries at the moment, so we’ve accelerated beyond belief in pace and the urgency, and these are with the same standard processes and architecture, using three different vendors, heavily based on standards and reused on processes. So core BSS and OSS processes reused country to country, in clusters of the same technology.”

The company’s multimillion dollar investment into its global BSS overhaul has as much to do with eliminating data systems fragmentation and simplifying the back-end of the services it offers as much as driving digital engagement with customers and readying itself for the company’s future, which Jordan says increasingly sees digital services at its core.

“We must become more digital in our interactions with our customers. The new generation of Telefónica customers don’t engage with us in the way they used to. Online is an important channel for us but a ‘digital only’ channel experience needs to be created in all the countries we operate in.”

But Jordan says this is part of a broader strategy to drive digital services – particularly platform-based services – within Telefónica, and as a key component of its market offerings.

“I don’t think we’ll ever be able to innovate as fast as the model that now exists around the internet and around the digital world, so adopting an open platform that innovators and entrepreneurs want to base their applications and their services on, and provide capabilities to innovate with, is central to where we want to go, and becoming a platform business, offering platform as a service, is a key element to our future.”

View the full article here!

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Pamoja disperses Cloud services through East Africa

Pamoja, the value-added services business entity and strategic arm leading SEACOM’s entry into content aggregation and Cloud computing services, will host its Cloud platform at Liquid Telecom’s East Africa Data Centre in Nairobi and use the facility to roll out Cloud services to the rapidly- expanding East Africa market.

According to a recent BizTech article, the company selected Nairobi, Kenya as its Cloud service delivery base because of its strategic location in relation to other countries in the East African market.

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Come and meet Pamoja at the upcoming Cloud World Forum Africa, taking place from 10-11 June at The Maslow, Johannesburg.

Liquid Telecom’s East Africa Data Centre is the largest and most sophisticated carrier-neutral data centre in East Africa and is the ideal facility in which Pamoja can host its Cloud platform. The Nairobi Cloud platform compliments Pamoja’s other Cloud platform that is located in South Africa.

Executive management at Pamoja says the data centre facilities meet the Company’s availability, security and connectivity needs. These are also base criteria for the ISO 27001 certification processs which Pamoja has embarked upon. The ISO 27001 standard is the specification for an Information Security Management System. The objective of the standard itself is to “provide requirements for establishing, implementing, maintaining and continuously improving an Information Security Management System (ISMS)”.

“By interconnecting the two Pamoja platforms through the SEACOM submarine cable infrastructure we are able to firstly provide Cloud services with a regional presence and secondly offer geographic redundancy to customers who demand this,” says Albie Bester, General Manager at Pamoja.

“With physical Cloud infrastructure in Africa Pamoja is able to address customer concerns about the location of their sensitive data and ensure improved service response times compare to Cloud services that are hosted in Europe or the US,” Bester adds.

The Kenyan and South African Cloud platforms are managed by the Pamoja Cloud Services team with support from SEACOM network operations.

“Our Cloud platform is based on the Microsoft Dynamic Datacentre blue print and through the use of advanced management and monitoring systems it is possible to ensure the highest level of availability with a relatively small team of experts.” Bester continues.

Pamoja is poised to help businesses across the continent take advantage of the shift towards Cloud, the impact of the internet and social networks on the corporate space and the relevance of Cloud computing to core operations across most businesses.

Forrester Research forecasts that the global market for Cloud computing will grow from $40,7 billion to more than $241 billion in 2020.

According to Bester Cloud adoption in Africa is in an exciting and budding phase and although issues like quality of connectivity and stable electricity sources still represent challenges, infrastructure is improving all the time. “Soon Africa will be ready to consume Cloud services at a large scale.”

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