Posts tagged ‘cloud asia’

Fujitsu partners with Equinix on Singapore cloud datacentre #cloudasia

Source: Business Cloud News

imageedit_9_3495507463

Fujitsu has set up another datacentre in Singapore this week amidst what it sees as increasing demand for cloud services in Singapore and neighbouring countries in the Asia-Pacific region.

The datacentre, hosted in Equinix’s western Singapore facility, will host Fujitsu’s portfolio of cloud services and offer a number of new connectivity features “currently under development” that would allow enterprises to federate with other cloud platforms.

The recently announced datacentre is Fujitsu’s third in Singapore, and it already operates over 100 worldwide; the company’s cloud services are hosted from six datacentres globally.

The company said it chose to add another datacentre in Singapore because of its strategic location and attractiveness to large multinational firms.

“In recent years, companies increasingly are embracing cloud services as a platform to support the accelerating pace of business in Asia. In particular, because of its low level of natural disaster related risk and its position as an international network hub with reliable broadband network lines, Singapore is often chosen as the location for integrated systems operations by many companies that are pursuing multinational business expansion,” the company said in a statement.

Fujitsu is the latest cloud vendor to view Singapore as a relatively untapped market for cloud services. This week CenturyLink, which recently expanded its managed services presence in China, added public cloud nodes to one of its Singapore datacentres.

Apart from locally established multinationals and the booming financial services sector, the Singapore Government has also shown itself to be looking to invest more in both using cloud services and growing usage of cloud platforms in the region.

According to Parallels, local SMBs are also hopping onto cloud platforms with reasonable pace. The firm believes the SMB cloud services market in Singapore is projected to hit $916M in 2017, with a three-year CAGR of 21 per cent.


 

15939-CAF-728x90-web-banner

Hear more about Cloud Asia at the Cloud Asia Forum taking place on 8th & 9th December 2015 at Mira Hong Kong!

PRE-REGISTER HERE.

CenturyLink expands public cloud in APAC #cloudasia

Source: Business Cloud News

American telco CenturyLink has expanded the presence of its
public cloud platform to Singapore in aCloud-datacentre bid to cater to growing regional demand for cloud services.

CenturyLink, which recently expanded its managed services presence in China and its private cloud services in Europe and the UK, is adding public cloud nodes to one of its Singapore datacentres.

Capturek

“The launch of a CenturyLink Cloud node in Singapore further enhances our position as a leading managed hybrid IT provider for businesses with operations in the Asia-Pacific region,” said Gery Messer, CenturyLink Managing Director, Asia Pacific.

“We continue to invest in the high-growth Asia-Pacific region to meet increasing customer demand,” Messer said.

The company said it wants to cater to what it sees as growing demand for cloud services in the region, citing Frost & Sullivan figures that show the Asia-Pacific region spent almost $6.6bn on public cloud services last year. That firm predicts annual cloud services spending in the region will exceed $20bn by 2018.

The move also comes at a time when the Singapore Government is looking to invest more in both using cloud services and growing usage of cloud platforms in the region.

Last year the Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore (IDA) said it was working with Amazon Web Services to trial a data as a service project the organisations believe will help increase the visibility of privately-held data sets.

The agency also signed a Memorandum of Intent with AWS that would see the cloud provider offer usage credits $3,000 (US) to the first 25 companies to sign up to the pilot, which will go towards the cost of hosting their dataset registries or datasets.

It’s also announced similar partnerships in the past with Pivotal and Red Hat.


 

15939-CAF-728x90-web-banner
Hear more about Cloud Asia at the Cloud Asia Forum taking place on 8th & 9th December 2015 at Mira Hong Kong!

PRE-REGISTER HERE.

Cloud Asia Forum Day One Gallery

Here are the best photos from an excellent first day of Cloud Asia Forum, Sheraton Hotel and Towers, Hong Kong. Be sure to join us on day two!

Cloud Forum Asia – John’s Story

Have you met John? You can do at Cloud Forum Asia. This is his story.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

See the whole story below. What’s your story?

Cloud Forum Asia – have you met John? from Enterprise Technology on Vimeo.

Deploying IaaS and Cloud in the Asian Financial Sector

August ChanAugust Chan is Head of IT at Delta Asia, and is participating in a cross-industry panel session at Cloud Asia entitled What Challenges Does X Industry Face When Adopting the Cloud, alongside Senior Representatives from Swiss Re and City University of Hong Kong. The session promises to offer a diverse approach to Cloud implementation, adding value for enterprises from all industry verticals.

Looking at August’s specific vertical, the financial sector, we looked at how Delta Asia has implemented Cloud computing so far, what models they have chosen to deploy at this stage, and why. He details that, as Delta Asia’s businesses are highly regulated (including banking, brokerage, insurance), they are vigilant in adopting Cloud, in view of possible (often time-consuming) regulator challenges, questions over compliance, and other non-technical considerations. In terms of rollout, they are ‘cloudifying’ peripheral systems first (that is, non-core systems such as their information portal and marketing-related applications). Cost effectiveness is one of the main objectives of their cloud strategy, with other main reasons being fast provision and easy scalability. August concludes that “all things considered, at this stage, IaaS is what we are working at”.

Looking more closely at those main objectives, we ask what cost and organisational benefits August expects to see from implementation. With IaaS being a relatively simple cloud adoption, he states that they can maintain lot of controls on the platform running on the ‘rented’ infrastructure, while the ‘landlord’ will handle the hardware availability, maintenance, aged equipment replacement. He goes on to say that “other than the cost saving by avoiding up-front capex investment, we are expected to be able to cope with some short-notice changes in business requirements, such as time-to-market and scalability”.

Many enterprises have concerns before adopting Cloud, and it was no different for Delta Asia. The reasons being that, in August’s words, for a highly regulated industry, those current and possible future regulatory requirements, internal due care and compliance considerations drove them to think about the security and control of data, the location and accessibility of it, and exit planning. But they always remind themselves to “get a good control on what you have and on what makes your business run. We are thus still at the IaaS stage”.

To conclude, we consider the enterprise landscape in Asia as a whole; are enterprises in the region taking full advantage and seeing benefits from technologies such as Cloud? August’s response is straightforward: “Obviously not.  I see many companies not utilizing cloud when it may be more cost effective than all in-sourcing”. So what advice would he offer for enterprises looking to develop their IT infrastructure? “I would suggest when you need to procure a new server or commission a new system, try thinking about cloud; don’t necessarily go for cloud, but think if cloud can help or not before spending on your capex”.

You can discuss this with August Chan and all of our industry experts at Cloud Asia, taking place in Hong Kong on 24-26 November. Enterprises can claim a complimentary full conference pass, with exhibition passes complimentary for all company types.

Cloud Asia

SMAC and the post-digital enterprise

What is SMAC, and how is it reshaping the enterprise?

Social, Mobility, Analytics, Cloud (or SMAC for short) is the new enterprise IT model that is disrupting the world. It is a genuine game-changer, and the organisations who are riding this wave most confidently are those which are embracing new technologies for future business.

The convergence of Social, Mobility, Analytics and Cloud will lead business technology for the next decade, and will act as an enabler for the next generation of technological trends. Entire business models and industries are now digitized, and market leaders are information-based, implementing a SMAC stack; an integrated technology platform where the combined components are greater than the sum of their parts. To borrow a slightly tenuous metaphor, if we think about SMAC as a human body: Social is the hands, interacting and sharing; Mobile is the senses, taking in the external environment; Analytics is the brain, and Cloud is the skeleton, the structure that holds it all together.

The customer-induced rise of SMAC

SMAC is driving new levels of productivity for enterprise, but this drive goes hand-in-hand with the rise of the post-digital customer. In this respect, SMAC was and is an inevitability; it almost created itself, the four elements of the layer found each other.

This post-digital customer utilises technological trends to change the relationship between them and the enterprise, increasing collaboration between external and internal stakeholders. In both business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-consumer (B2C) organizations, buying behaviour has changed irrevocably. And this change is SMAC in a nutshell: Customers process information from a great number of sources to enable more informed purchase decisions; they get their information to purchase, advised by social and shared media, wherever and whenever they need and want it. Analytics and Cloud allow businesses to analyze buying behaviour, tapping into their customers and understanding them better, and as a result can develop products, delivery channels and marketing methods to match this behaviour.

What does an enterprise in the post-digital era look like?

post-digital enterprise

It has a holistic, integrated technology strategy, including: customers, the enterprise ecosystem and channels to cater for evolving demands and behaviour. Effective use of these channels helps to:

  • Increase sales by monetising demand
  • Increase effectiveness of marketing campaigns
  • Enhance product development
  • Drive multi-channel commerce
  • Strengthen customer engagement

What can enterprises do?

It is an unavoidable fact that, in many cases, IT architecture in the enterprise was built more than 10 years ago, meaning that it is difficult for it to align with the digital age, let alone the post-digital age. However, there are steps that all enterprises can take towards SMAC convergence:

  • Make websites, purchase channels and software applications available and fully-optimized for mobile
  • Externalise and socialise web and software applications, by integrating them with social networks, and installing social features on them
  • Integrate software with machines, devices, smart meters and sensors
  • Converge the user data generated from web and software applications to get real-time business intelligence and customer insights; this data can then be analysed to offer specialised and personalised services

The concept of ‘data gravity’ is important, ie. A bigger mass of data, like a planet, attracts things to it: traffic, word of mouth, customers, sales. While there was a case against amassing data in the past due to storage costs, the decline in these costs makes the argument for keeping and analysing lots of data compelling.

And finally…

The organisations that are thriving in terms of post-digital customer engagement are those which offer high insight over high touch. While TV channels, high street stores and dictionaries offer significant information, Netflix, Amazon and Google know what you want to watch, buy and search for almost before you do; they utilise a converged SMAC stack to know and communicate with customers on their own terms, driving their businesses forward.

Achieving business and IT agility through SMAC is a core theme of the 5th Annual Cloud Asia event, taking place in Hong Kong on 24th-26th November 2014. Enterprises can claim a complimentary pass to find out how organisations including the Hong Kong Government, Delta Airlines, Swiss Re, Tesco Lotus, Cyberport, Microsoft, EMC, Amazon and Google are embracing this new wave of technological convergence.

Cloud Asia

With thanks to:

‘SMAC: the new enterprise IT model’, by Cognizant

‘The SMAC Code – Embracing new technologies for future business’, by KPMG India

‘SMAC: The Game Changer’, by BT&BT

‘How to Build a SMAC Enabled Enterprise’, by Mariner

“Fully in the Cloud, fully mobile, and no longer tied to our physical infrastructure”

We caught up with Ben Dornier, Director of Corporate and Community Services, City of Palmerston, Australia, for a quickfire Q&A about the challenges of and opportunities presented by, deploying Cloud services in his public sector organisation. Ben will be hopping across the South China Sea in December 2014 to speak in the Enterprise Cloud stream at Cloud Asia, about ‘Getting Cloud Ready: Building Your Cloud Agenda’. The full brochure is available now, and Enterprises and Public Sector organisations can claim a complimentary pass for the event.

How has your organisation implemented cloud computing so far and what models have you chosen to deploy, and why?

Ben DornierWe are using office365 for email as well as office product licences. We also used specialised cloud apps for asset management and contract management, as well as Council (board) and committee agendas and minutes. This sounds small, but if we get it wrong it is a big problem! Elected officials in particular expect access to information anytime and anywhere. Our cloud road map includes moving all our virtual servers into a cloud datacentre within the next 18 months, allowing us to be fully in the cloud, fully mobile – and most important considering our weather conditions and disaster management problems – no longer tied to our physical infrastructure.

What cost and organisational benefits do you expect to see from implementation?

Cost has not been the primary concern. The Northern Territory of Australia experiences annual cyclones and extreme weather conditions (not to mention deadly crocodiles and jellyfish!), so the primary concern has been the ability to open Council services from just a few laptops and mobile devices in order to protect our community in extreme conditions.

This said, Council has experienced cost savings related to reduced capex spending and reduced overheads for specialised IT staff. We are happy with our managed services providers, and we are enjoying having SLAs rather than employment contracts.

Can you tell us more about how the public sector is embracing cloud services in Australia, the concerns you had before adopting ‘cloud’, and how they were eased?

This of course depends on a working definition of ‘cloud’! A large number – maybe 90 of the 580 – local governments in Australia are purely cloud-based. Staff there might not even know it! Every local government makes use of some cloud based solution to varying degrees. In an era where doing more with less becomes increasingly important, cloud solutions are allowing IT staff to become more strategic, agile and responsive to the needs of the organisation.

I have been publicly engaging in cloud discussions for 15 years or so, and conversations always turn to ‘security issues’ (some things will never change!). For certain sectors of government, this is a reasonable discussion, but for local government (with a few caveats!) most our data is regarding mowing schedules, road conditions, facility maintenance, sewage and water quality, etcetera. This stuff does no good being kept secret. In my opinion, the security constraints for local government are drastically less than other levels of government. With this comes issues of data sovereignty and data centre location. In many states there are rules around this, but the flexibility and affordability offered by cloud solutions is mature enough to provide great options for us in the local and international space.

Do you think the public sector is taking full advantage and seeing benefits from technologies such as cloud and data analytics and management?

Absolutely not – we have a long way to go before the insights afforded by big data solutions will mature in our sector. Like the old TV show said, “we have the technology” – we just aren’t terribly good at figuring out how to use it as a tool to improve services to our constituents. We are making inroads, however, and it often means considering our data from a citizen viewpoint – ‘what would a resident want to know about waste management?’ for example. These insights need to further drive the use of analytics, and not just better executive decision making dashboards.

What are your next IT objectives and how do you think your business processes can be made more efficient going forward?

We are a rapidly growing community, and are seeking to be agile. We will be totally cloud and scalable by 1 Jan 2016. Our IT staff will be totally focused on delivering value and solutions to staff without being hampered by infrastructure. They will be focused on data analysis and strategy, rather than administration. I believe the biggest benefit of cloud based services has been the commodification of server admin and network services, and we will make this a strength moving into the future.

Cloud Asia

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: