Archive for the ‘Guest Blog’ Category

Denial ain’t just a river in Egypt…#CloudWF

Guest Blog with NCC Group

Author: John Parkinson, NCC Group

During the Cloud World Forum event in London on 24 July, we discussed the opportunities for Software as a Service businesses to become more successful. Focussing on the neglected issue of commercial security, we asked how the SaaS market can provide answers to potential supply failure in the market.  By anticipating, understanding and addressing the risks for customers who rely on outsourced application services, we argued that providers can contribute more to enhancing trust and confidence in the Software as a Service market.

How are SaaS businesses reacting to the issue?  In our experience, there are three broadly different attitudes:

  1. It was Mark Twain who perceptively wrote that ‘Denial ain’t just a river in Egypt’. The Risk Deniers perform according to type in asserting that it just won’t happen. ‘I haven’t failed yet and have no plans to do so’. Said with conviction it is likely that they have convinced themselves. As Isaac Asimov once wrote, they cling to the view that the easiest way to solve a problem is to deny it exists
  2. The largest group, the Agnostics, take a more considered view. They concede the possibility and see the wisdom of having a plan, but only if someone raises the question.  Whether hoping against hope, firmly in the wait and see camp or just too busy with other stuff, they generally accord with the opinion elucidated by TS Eliot that humankind cannot bear too much reality.
  3. Last but by no means least are the Innovators. They align instinctively to the perspective of Peter Drucker that innovation is the specific instrument of entrepreneurship. Salmon Software is one good example of a business that recognises this. John Byrne, the Salmon MD says ‘we understand the needs of our customers and the potential impacts of them not having access to the application’. Similarly Wazuko MD, Simon Hill asserts that the objective is ‘to show our existing customers and prospects that stepping into the cloud with Wazuko is simple and secure.’ Operating in a highly regulated sector of finance is Banking system provider, Mambu. MD Eugene Danilkis in a blog article commented: ‘Regulators have rightly recognised the critical role that technology providers play to support key business processes.  In turn, technology providers need to ensure consistent and reliable delivery of these services that financial institutions depend on to reinforce trust and extend the potential for future innovation and growth.’

As a SaaS Provider, which category do you fall into – a Denier, an Agnostic or an Innovator And which type of business would you trust when outsourcing your software services?

Original NCC Group blog here

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NCC Group were a Visionary Sponsor at the Cloud World Forum 2015, which took place on the 24th – 25th June.

The Cloud & DevOps World Forum delivers speed and continuous delivery to Europe’s Digital Enterprises, and will take place on the 21st – 22nd June 2016, at Olympia in London.

Register your interest for 2016 here

Google and Why the New Standard for Modern Applications is a Non-Relational Database Deployed in the Cloud #CloudWF

Guest Blog with MongoDB

Google and Why the New Standard for Modern Applications is a Non-Relational Database Deployed in the Cloud

Author: Kelly Stirman, VP of strategy at MongoDB

It’s positively raining cloud stories. Sorry. Cloud puns are so over…cast. Regardless, recent months have seen some interesting developments in the high stakes game for control of the foundational layer of your application stack i.e. what database you use and where it’s deployed. In early May Google released Cloud BigTable as a managed NoSQL database. Two weeks later Gartner released its  Magic Quadrant for Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (Cloud IaaS) report.

While unrelated, the two announcements both shine some light on our path to a new, cloud-rich future. While the aspiring cloud giant Google gave further validation, if it were needed, that  NoSQL databases deployed in the cloud are the new standard for modern applications.

You see, the workload from modern applications is quite different from what it’s been in the past. Building your own data centre and installing a relational database was fine when you could predict the size, speed and type of data. Applications in 2015 are a different breed. The growth of social, mobile and sensor data has dramatically altered the way we approach development. Developers can’t tell in advance what any of this will look like in the final production version of their application, let alone future iterations.

Many organisations are already overcoming this by deploying non-relational databases on commodity hardware in the cloud. This approach lets companies gear up for massive scale and gives them enough flexibility to incorporate new data types that will support business processes and provide operational insight.

Google’s BigTable and Gartner’s Magic Quadrant

Google’s announcement highlighted two things. One: the big infrastructure players are looking to diversify and find new ways to wring revenue from the big data stack. Two: BigTable’s release illustrated that all major data innovation is happening away from relational data models.  Relational databases aren’t going anywhere fast, but they are challenged by the requirements of modern applications. In particular the trickiest of the three Vs of big data – variety of data types. BigTable is yet another database-as-a-service offering that is designed to be deployed on the vendor’s own cloud infrastructure, see also Amazon and Microsoft.

From one cloud provider’s announcement, we now look at a broader view of the industry from Gartner. This is from the introduction to the Magic Quadrant for Cloud Infrastructure as a Service, Worldwide report[1]:

The market for cloud IaaS is in a state of upheaval, as many service providers are shifting their strategies after failing to gain enough market traction. Customers must exercise caution when choosing providers.

The report went on to explain that ‘all the providers evaluated are believed to be financially stable, with business plans that are adequately funded. However, many of the providers are undergoing significant re-evaluation of their cloud IaaS businesses’. In other words, some vendors may not be in it for the long haul.

What it means for you

As well as diversification into database services, the cloud competition is also sparking a healthy price war. Just a few days after the Magic Quadrant was released Google announced it was slashing prices by as much as 30%. Microsoft and Amazon are also fond of aggressive pricing as they try to eat as much market share as possible.

Which brings us back to Google’s launch of NoSQL database-as-a-service BigTable. The release came on the back of Microsoft’s recent Azure DocumentDB announcement and, of course Amazon’s own DynamoDB offering. As the competition for cloud infrastructure drives margins down, the big players are looking up the stack to drive revenue and it’s clear NoSQL technology is one of the most attractive areas.

Though it’s worth pointing out that these as-a-service database offerings generally come with a very narrow set of features. For example Cloud BigTable is a wide column store with a simple key-value query model. Like some other NoSQL databases, it is limited by:

  • A complex data model which presents a steep learning curve to developers, slowing the rate of new application development
  • Lack of features such as an expressive query language (key-value only), integrated text search, native secondary indexes, aggregations and more. Collectively, these enable organisations to build more functional applications faster

Ultimately the cloud providers can relieve users of some of the overhead of running a database but they still will have to deal with the complexity of mastering data models and working around key-value query limitations.

Out of the chaos it’s becoming clear that a non-relational database hosted in the cloud, is going to be the predominant way modern companies deploy applications. Each customer will have varying demands of control. Some will want everything ‘as-a-service’, others will want full control over how and where their database runs and security on each layer of the stack. In the modern world of cloud-ready, non-relational databases, you have more choice than ever. That choice can also bring a risk of vendor lock-in, if you select an offering that is tied to one specific platform, no matter how ‘web-scale’ that platform claims to be.

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[1] Gartner, Magic Quadrant for Cloud Infrastructure as a Service, Worldwide, Lydia Leong et al, May 18, 2015

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MongoDB will be exhibiting at the Cloud World Forum taking place on the 24th & 25th June 2015.

Kelly Stirman is Vice President of Strategy at MongoDB, speaking at the Cloud World Forum on the 25th June at 10.35 in Theatre A: Keynote – Building Business in the Cloud on ‘Escaping Cloud Cuckoo Land: 5 Tips for Making Success a Reality in the Cloud.’

REGISTER YOUR FREE EXHIBITION PASS HERE.

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The state of cloud computing in Europe #CloudWF

Guest Blog with IBM

Author: Simon Porter

Cloud computing is the most touted technology in the global business landscape today. Europe is no exception.

There are two main ways we’re seeing businesses take advantage of the cloud in Europe. First, there are the smaller, innovative, and born-on-the-cloud startup companies that use it to help them disrupt existing industries by getting to market faster and with less upfront capital investment.

The second area where we’re seeing European companies take advantage of cloud is at more established enterprises looking to enter new, international markets. As companies here seek to become more global, they’re looking toward non-European markets—whether by selling into those markets or tapping into suppliers. In these cases, cloud empowers them to enter these new markets by providing the flexibility, speed and scalability needed to be a global player.

Cloud also enables businesses to market and sell to customers in new and more efficient ways. With the proliferation of smartphones and social media, business success relies on turning this technology into new sales channels. This is often referred to as systems of engagement, and with unpredictable volumes, it’s ideally suited to cloud.

The economic climate in Europe is improving, but it remains very competitive. It is critical for businesses to optimize their supply chains and lower their sales and support costs. Applying sophisticated analytics is one effective way of doing this. In the past, this was prohibitively expensive. But cloud enables analytics-as-a-service, removing the need and cost for a large up-front investment in an IT system that may be used only a few hours per month.

Challenges in cloud adoption persist

According to a Eurostat study released this past year, only 19 percent of European businesses used cloud computing services in 2014. Compare that to a recent RightScale study that reports 82 percent of U.S. enterprises as having a hybrid cloud strategy (up from 74 percent in 2014), and it would appear that Europe is lagging. However, that’s only part of the story.

You can expect the European cloud adoption numbers to rise sharply this year and even more in years to come. But as with any emerging technology, there remains barriers to adoption.

Chief among those barriers is security.

According to a recent Cloud Industry Forum poll, 70 percent of U.K. executives cited data security among their biggest concerns in moving to cloud. That marks an 11 percent year-over-year increase.

What IT departments in Europe are seeing is something quite different than what the rest of the world is experiencing, and that stems from data location and security. A lot of the questions around security and data location are driven by perceptions in the market that aren’t always true. Security in a cloud-based solution will often be much stronger than that of an on-premises, in-house IT solution.

To remain competitive, European businesses must work through security challenges—and I fully believe that they will. It’s ultimately not a matter of technical or legal challenges preventing cloud adoption in Europe—it’s about business leaders understanding the transformational benefits cloud can bring to their business, and then typically for midsize businesses taking advantage of this by using a local trusted Cloud Service Provider.

The good news  is that IBM is continuing to open data centers in Europe. We now have centers in the U.K., Netherlands, Germany, France, and most recently announced, Italy. But even with this span of locations, customers want to keep their data in country.

European SMBs typically lack resources and the IT skills to take advantage of this new kind of capability. They need to turn to a local service provider that can essentially be their IT department. At IBM, we’re continuing to expand our partnerships with local cloud service providers as a means of enabling local data and secure environments with IBM’s Managed Service Providers.

A move to hybrid 

In the business world, we recognize clients have already made investments in core IT systems. We find that European customers want to protect and enhance them with new, innovative capabilities that enable them to make better business decisions faster with advanced analytics. Companies are also able to reach new customers and markets with multi-channel marketing and sales capabilities, both largely based on cloud-enabled digital and social technologies.

For example, a client may have an existing enterprise resource planning (ERP) system that they have invested a lot of time and money in over the years. They still need to see a return on that investment. It is impractical to completely replace it with a new solution, but perhaps enhancing it with social analytics or social engagement could help them in their customer service and marketing.

Combining mission-critical, on-premises systems with new cloud-based systems of engagement is an example of a common hybrid cloud solution. This is how many businesses in Europe protect their existing investments in IT while taking advantage of new delivery models.

An eye toward the future 

The world is only getting flatter. There are multiple new entrants in many industries, and existing businesses will have to differentiate their own offerings to remain competitive. Who would have thought the taxi industry could be disrupted in the way that Uber has done? Cloud can be the key enabler for businesses to innovate around new products and channels faster and in a lower risk manner.

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IBM will be at the Cloud World Forum on Stand D150, taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015.

Tony Morgan, Client Chief Innovation Officer GTS Europe at IBM will be speaking on Day 1 at 11:05am in Theatre C: DevOps & Containerisation on ‘Speaker out of the Shadows: Managing Innovation with Cloud.’ 

REGISTER YOUR FREE EXHIBITION PASS HERE.

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Monetizing the Internet of Things: Will All These Connected Devices Pay Off? #CloudWF

Guest Blog with Avangate

Author: Michael Ni, CMO/SVP, Marketing and Products, Avangate

Sometimes it seems like just yesterday that everything was getting “cloud-ified,” from photo sharing to customer relationship management, but the move to the cloud is actually a couple of years old these days. But now that we all have our documents stored in the cloud (and our heads out of the clouds), everybody’s looking for a clear path toward success in the latest trend: the Internet of Things.

Just like the cloud before it, the Internet of Things is now top of mind for software professionals. Its promise has been nascent for a long time: although Dick Tracy’s 2-Way Wrist Radio first appeared in 1946, connected devices like the FitBit and Apple Watch are just starting to get in the hands – or on the wrists – of everyday folks.

With broader adoption of connected devices come both opportunities and challenges. Even the companies that are able to sell IoT hardware successfully find themselves needing to develop and monetize complementary services to help users get the most out of their devices. And software-focused companies that don’t have devices need new a way to get in on the IoT and the billions it’s expected to bring in. That way is through data.

While the IoT started out with connected sensors, it soon became clear that simply sensing data wouldn’t be enough. Just like storing content in the cloud also required building interfaces that made it easy for users to access cloud content, IoT sensors now need to produce data that’s easy for people to find, understand and use. And because IoT data is so valuable (not to mention expensive), there needs to be a way for companies to monetize it. So if wave 1 of the IoT trend involved simply creating the sensors, wave 2 involves monetizing them and the data they create.

As a result, more and more software vendors have started staking a claim in the IoT. At Avangate, we’ve been helping companies like Bitdefender monetize their IoT offerings. Bitdefender offers a “security of things” solution called BOX, a small device that scans for IoT threats on a local WiFi connection. By monitoring the way your smart devices stay connected, BOX finds and protects against possible threats to your connected information. By helping Bitdefender easily monetize its entry into the IoT, including not only the device itself but also associated data, we’re showing the importance and ease of monetizing IoT devices and the data they produce.

And that’s the key: commerce absolutely has to run in the background of every IoT play. No matter how affordable a device is up front, or if streams of data are free for now, devices and data both cost a significant amount to create, maintain, and provide in ways that really work for consumer and business customers. As a result, to truly succeed in the IoT, software companies need to be able to package and sell data derived from connected devices in ways that will benefit other entities as well.

In the end, it’s clear that that the desperate need for IoT data monetization is actually a massive opportunity. Companies are still scrambling to create devices and support data, and not enough entities are thinking about how to monetize it. Those who find themselves able to successfully package and sell information in the IoT era may find themselves enjoying Salesforce style status and riding high on the wave of the future as the IoT truly takes off.

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Avangate will be exhibiting at the Cloud World Forum on Stand D48, taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015.

REGISTER YOUR FREE EXHIBITION PASS HERE.

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The State of the Cloud: Already Everywhere, and Lots of Room to Grow #CloudWF

Guest Blog with Equinix

Enterprise cloud usage is nearly universal, but there’s still significant room for cloud growth.

That sums up one of the key findings of RightScale’s 2015 “State of the Cloud Report.” The survey of 930 technical professionals indicates the enterprise has moved past its initial cloud skittishness and is getting quite comfortable investigating what the cloud can really do.

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The survey showed 93% of respondents have adopted cloud, roughly the same as the prior year. Hybrid cloud is also the preferred strategy of 58% of respondents, compared to 30% who are public cloud-only and 5% who are private cloud-only.

One key difference from 2014 is that 38% of cloud users are now classified by RightScale as “cloud explorers,” compared to 25% just a year ago when “cloud beginners” was the biggest category. “Cloud explorers” already have multiple projects and applications in the cloud and are looking to expand and improve their cloud use.

The survey also found plenty of room for cloud expansion, with 68% of enterprise respondents reporting that less than a fifth of their applications are currently running in the cloud. Most respondents (55%) also report that another fifth of their applications are already built on cloud-friendly architectures.

Here’s more of what we found most interesting in the State of the Cloud report:

Going public, staying private

Public cloud is being used by 88% of organizations, while 63% are using private cloud. But private cloud is still carrying a heavier workload, with 13% of enterprises running more than 1,000 virtual machines (VMs) in the public cloud and 22% running more than 1,000 virtual machines in private cloud. The survey also indicated enterprises are expecting to grow public cloud workloads more quickly.

Central IT gets more cloud comfortable

The survey authors note that in 2014, business units envisioned a more limited role for central IT in cloud purchasing decisions, likely because they felt central IT was generally too cautious. But central IT’s view of the cloud may be evolving. The survey indicated central IT concerns about cloud security have dropped, with 41% now reporting it as a significant challenge, compared to 47% a year ago. In addition, 28% of central IT respondents report public cloud as the top priority in 2015, compared to 18% in 2014.

More of the same

Respondents cited the same cloud benefits and challenges in 2015, but in many cases mentioned them more frequently. For instance, “greater stability,” “faster access to infrastructure,” and “high availability” were again the top three benefits, but each was cited by a greater percentage of respondents:

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A similar pattern was seen when respondents were asked about cloud challenges. “Security,” “lack of resources/expertise” and “compliance” again appeared as major concerns, but were referred to by a greater percentage of respondents, compared to last year:

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Learn more about how Equinix can help your enterprise realize cloud benefits and meet cloud challenges.

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Equinix will be at the Cloud World Forum on Stand D170, taking place on the 24th – 25th June 2015. Don’t miss their session on ‘An Expedition through the Cloud’ in the Employee Experience Theatre at 10.35am on Day 2.

REGISTER YOUR FREE EXHIBITION PASS HERE.

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The 6 hidden costs of cloud IT services #CloudWF

Guest Blog with Intermedia

The 6 hidden costs of cloud IT services

So you’re considering moving email, file management, or archiving to the cloud. You even have quotes from a few providers you’re checking out. Great! It’s a step in the right direction to support your company’s growth. But be careful: what you end up paying might not always match your quote. There are costs beyond the monthly service fee.

The good news is that those hidden costs are avoidable. To help you with your due diligence, we compiled a list of the costs you may encounter.

  1. The cost of migrating data to the new service

Let’s say you’re switching email providers. You might think data migration is free. And it might even be—in the sense that it’s not a line item in the invoice. But if you have to do it yourself, it will cost the valuable time of your IT staff. And what if you need assistance? Some providers may only help for a fee, and others will refer you to a third-party consultant. So make sure you ask about data migration, and make sure your provider will includes white-glove service for free.

  1. The cost of downtime imposed by low reliability

When an essential IT service is unavailable, your business incurs extremely high costs: your employees can’t do their jobs, your customers get angry, you lose sales, and IT resources are diverted to cope with the crisis. Many providers promise 99.9% uptime. And while this may sound good, it actually adds up to more than 525 minutes of unplanned downtime per year. Consider this and make sure you settle for no less than a 99.999% uptime guarantee— which is less than 30 seconds of downtime a month.

  1. The cost of not getting enough support

When you’re experiencing a problem, regardless of its severity, you need quick answers or your productivity suffers. You can’t be productive if you’re on hold—or if you’re pushed to self-help support portals. However, many providers only offer phone support for critical or tier 2 issues. Even then, support centers are often outsourced or staffed with non-certified personnel. These factors add up to costly unproductive time. A good support plan will include 24/7 live support, short hold times, and skilled, certified staff.

  1. The cost of sub-par security and protection

Security breaches are not just a costly drain on time, they create risk that could hurt your business. So where security is concerned, you must be confident that your business cloud provider has you covered. However, many providers use lesser-known security tools and fewer still help respond to eDiscovery requests. Make sure you get the nitty-gritty details on security procedures from your provider and don’t settle on less than the gold standard and the best-known names.

  1. The cost of management inefficiency

Your cloud management console should be powerful enough to support your IT needs, but simple enough to use that you can easily use it—and, indeed, that you can delegate certain tasks to non-technical resources. Otherwise your IT staff is wasting precious time on tasks that should be trivial. When you look at management consoles, they can be quite complicated and most provide no ability to manage additional third-party services. Make sure you get a solution that balances ease-of-use with granular control to avoid imposing undue labour costs on your IT team.

  1. The cost of services that lack integration

Your business is probably adding more and more cloud services. But as you add more services, you introduce more support, billing and management complexities. And so you end up in a tangle of services that you have to untie. Compare this to top providers with integrations that let you share user and device settings across services. Without this, the cost of managing your IT can skyrocket.

Choose your cloud provider carefully.

As the customer, you have a choice. Choose a cloud-based IT services provider that offers you transparent and worry-free service. Insist on getting the full range of services with no hidden costs, including migration, security, and management. Make it easy for your IT staff to get the support they need: look for 24/7 phone and chat support for admins, handled by certified staff. And don’t settle when it comes to the service level agreement: make sure you get “five nines” uptime. That way, you can focus on growing your business.

www.intermedia.co.uk
+44(0)203 384 2158

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Intermedia will be exhibiting at the Cloud World Forum taking place on the 24th & 25th June 2015, on Stand D160.

REGISTER YOUR FREE EXHIBITION PASS HERE.

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Scaling Your Application Efficiently – Horizontal or Vertical? #CloudWF

Guest Blog with AppDynamics

Author: Eric Smith at AppDynamics

Anyone deploying an application in production probably has some experience with scaling to meet increased demand. A generation ago, virtualization made scaling your application as simple as increasing your instance count or size. However, now with the advent of cloud, you can scale to theoretical infinity. Maybe you’ve even set up some auto-scaling based on underlying system metrics such as CPU, heap size, thread count, etc. Now the question changes from “Can I scale my environment to meet demand?” (if you add enough computing resources you probably can), to “How can I efficiently scale my infrastructure to accommodate my traffic, and if I’m lucky maybe even scale down when needed?” This is a problem I run into almost every day dealing with DevOps organizations.

If your application environment looks like this (if so, I’d love to be you):

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You can probably work your way through to the solution, eventually. Run a bunch of load tests, find a sweet spot of machine size based on the performance under the test parameters, and bake it into your production infrastructure. Add more instances to each tier when your CPU usage gets high. Easy. What if your application looks like this?

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What about when your application code changes? What if adding more instances no longer fixes your problem? (Those do cost money, and the bill adds up quickly…)

The complexity of the problem is that CPU bounding is only one aspect — most applications encounter a variety of bounds as they scale and they vary at each tier. CPU, memory, heap size, thread count, database connection pool, queue depth, etc. come into play from an infrastructure perspective. Ultimately, the problem breaks down to response time: how do I make each transaction as performant as possible while minimizing overhead?

The holy grail here is the ability to determine dynamically how to size my app server instances (right size), how many to create at each level (right scale) and when to create them (right time). Other factors come into play as well such as supporting infrastructure, code issues, and the database — but let’s leave that for another day.

Let me offer a simple example. This came into play recently when working with a customer analyzing their production environment. Looking at the application tier under light/normal load, it was difficult to determine what factors to scale, we ended up with this:

Screen-Shot-2015-03-17-at-10.57.54-AM

Response time actually decreases toward the beginning of the curve (possibly a caching effect?). But if you look at the application under heavier load, things get more interesting. All of a sudden you can start to see how performance is affected as demand on the application increases:

Screen-Shot-2015-03-17-at-10.58.02-AM

Looking at a period of heavy load in this specific application, hardware resources are actually still somewhat lightly utilized, even though response time starts to spike:

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In this application, it appears that response time is actually more closely correlated with garbage collection than any specific hardware bound.

While there is clearly some future effort here to look at garbage collection optimization, in this case optimizing best fit actually comes down to determining desired response time, maximum load for a given instance size maintaining that response time, and cost for that instance size. In a cloud scenario, instance cost is typically fairly easy to determine. In this case, you can normalize this by calculating volume/(instance cost) at various instance sizes to determine a better sweet spot for vertical scale.

Horizontal scale will vary somewhat by environment, but this tends to be more linear — i.e. each additional instance adds incremental bandwidth to the application.

There’s still quite a bit more room for analysis of this problem, like resource cost for individual transactions, optimal response time vs. cost to achieve that response time, synchronous vs. asynchronous design trade-offs, etc. but these will vary based on the specific environment.

Using some of these performance indicators from the application itself (garbage collection, response time, connection pools, etc.) rather than infrastructure metrics, we were able to quickly and intelligently right size the cloud instances under the current application release as well as determine several areas for code optimization to help improve their overall efficiency. While the code optimization is a forward looking project, the scaling question was in response to a near term impending event that needed to be addressed. Answering the question in this way allowed us to meet both the near term impending deadline, but also remain flexible enough to accommodate any forthcoming optimizations or application changes.

Interested to see how you can scale your environment? Check out a FREE trial now!

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John Rakowski, Chief Technology Strategist at AppDynamics will be speaking at the Cloud World Forum on 25th June 2015 at 2.25 pm.

His talk will take place in Theatre C: SDE & Hyperscale Computing on ‘Three Rules for the Digital Enterprise’. 

REGISTER YOUR FREE EXHIBITION PASS HERE.

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